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Florida tax collector’s offices officially take over license services

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A bill signed in 2011 that mandated all tax collector’s offices take over the drivers license and identification card services went into full effect Thursday in Alachua County.

The new system hopes to do away with the negatives stereotypes of most drivers license services including long waits, inefficient services and time drains. John Power, chief deputy tax collector for Alachua County, said the tax collector’s offices in Alachua County issued their first drivers license in January and have served more than 10,000 license issues since then.

The program, which has been in the works for more than a year, has experienced a smooth transition to full-time services, Power said.

The biggest improvement to the drivers license program is the online aspect. Power said residents will now be able to go online — either on a computer or a mobile device — and see current wait times as well as appointment availabilities at all three locations. The new locations are 3207 SW 35th Blvd., 12 SE First St. and 5801 NW 34th St.

To fund this transition, fee structures have changed and a $6.25 increase has been added to drivers license transactions.

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