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Hearing for Pedro Bravo rescheduled to June 11

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Carlos Aguilar Sr., Christian Aguilar's grandfather, drove to Gainesville from South Florida with his family for the hearing of Christian's alleged murderer. He stood outside of the courthouse after the hearing while his son spoke to media representatives.
Carlos Aguilar Sr., Christian Aguilar's grandfather, drove to Gainesville from South Florida with his family for a hearing for his grandson's alleged murderer. He stood outside the courthouse after the hearing while his son spoke to media representatives.

Carlos Aguilar and his family drove up to Gainesville from South Florida for the fourth time, only to find out the hearing for his son’s alleged murderer would be rescheduled to June 11.

Tuesday’s proceedings lasted no more than 10 minutes and marked the third time the case management hearing has been moved.

“I’m really disappointed that they continue to delay the process,” Aguilar said. “Justice is not being served.”

Pedro Bravo, the 19-year-old charged with Christian Aguilar’s murder, appeared in court 2 p.m. Tuesday. Attorneys were to discuss the status of the current case with the judge and schedule what comes next.

Instead, the state attorney’s office requested the hearing be postponed because the judge overseeing the case will change in May.

Aguilar said every time he and his family come to Gainesville, they relive the memory of his son’s death but will continue to attend every hearing to fight for justice.

“Even if it’s for two minutes, it’s worth it,” he said.

There are seven charges filed against Bravo, including premeditated murder, kidnapping and destroying evidence.

Bravo’s attorney, Michael Ruppert, could not be reached for comment.

About Stefanie Cainto

Stefanie is a reporter for WUFT News who may be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news @wuft.org

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