WUFT News

Lake County seeks alligator trappers

By on April 9th, 2013

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting applications for people interested in being contracted nuisance alligator trappers in south Lake County.

Preference will be given to applicants who live south of the Florida Turnpike because that is the area without a trapper, said Joy Hill, the northeast regional spokeswomen for the commission.

Applicants must have live in Lake County, have an active email address, clean criminal history and no fish and wildlife law violations, according to a comission press release.

Last year there were 424 nuisance alligator permits issued and that 328 of those alligators were harvested in Lake County, Hill said.

More than 5,700 alligators were captured and harvested last year in the state.

Hill said normally when an alligator sees or hears a person, they scatter. The alligators that don’t leave and don’t seem concerned are considered nuisance alligators.

In addition, alligators that are less than four feet are not considered nuisance alligators and are not trapped.

Trappers are not paid for their work but can earn money by selling the skin and meat of the alligators they harvest.

“This is an opportunity to save the tax payers of Florida money by having people do this who are willing to help out,” Hill said.


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