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SFC panel to discuss lack of African-American men in health care on Thursday


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Santa Fe College is hosting a panel Thursday night that will discuss how African-American men can be successful nurses, stemming from gender and economic stereotypes about people working in health care.

Current students in health science programs will join African-American professionals as they tell their stories about their journey to professional and academic success. The panel, comprised of graduates from Santa Fe’s health science program, will share the obstacles they overcame to become successful in the industry.

“We have a shortage of African-American men who apply to our programs at Santa Fe College and a shortage generally in these careers,” said Scott Fortner, program adviser. “We want to show them all the possibilities of the outstanding employment opportunities that are local and national for these careers.”

The panel will be held at Abiding Faith Christian Church, located at 6529 NW 39th Ave., from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Anyone interested in health care is encouraged to attend.

Rebekah Geier edited this story online.

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