WUFT News

Marijuana eradication program uncovering statewide drug growth

By on March 13th, 2013

Marijuana growth is rampant throughout Florida, but according to this year’s domestic marijuana eradication report, the Drug Enforcement Administration is cracking down on local cannabis.

Last year, according to the report, the DEA allocated $500,000 to the state’s Domestic Marijuana Eradication Program, an increase of $50,000 from 2011.

Judith Ivester, program coordinator for domestic marijuana eradication, said those resources funded marijuana-growth detection training for law enforcement agencies throughout the state.

Ivester said 87 percent of the funding was used to reimburse investigative costs for local agencies, providing an incentive to identify, investigate and eradicate the growth of the plant.

In Florida, 772 growth sites were recorded according to the report, which equated to 723 growth-related arrests and the eradication of 37,388 plants.

Ivester said North Central Florida is a hotbed for marijuana growth.

She said in southern Florida, indoor growth is more prevalent because the area is more urban. Growers in counties like Dade and Broward try to move their product inside to avoid detection.

“The north region of Florida is more rural,” Ivester said. “There’s more opportunity and more area to grow outside than there are indoor growths.”

Ivester said Florida leads the nation with the number of indoor growths reported to the DEA. Last year, 32,306 plants were eradicated from indoor growths alone. The remaining 5,802 plants were found on outside sites.

“We do know that that’s a trend with growers,” Ivester said. “They are moving their operations indoor. It’s harder to detect indoor growth than outdoor.”

Ivester said the domestic marijuana eradication program is working to improve its efforts in the years to come.

“We do think with all of the other drug problems in Florida – the pill mills, the meth problems – marijuana sometimes may not be as a high priority in some areas as they are in others,” Ivester said. “But with the funding that’s available to them (local law enforcement agencies), it’s still an incentive for them to keep on top of that and to get that information reported to us.”

Rachel Crosby wrote this story online.


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  • http://www.facebook.com/jim.heffner.96 Jim Heffner

    Isn’t Florida the pill capital of the world? Didn’t Obama say the war on cannabis was over? Oh well what’s another $billion or so to the deficit.

  • popie

    DEA Idiots.

  • D Napier

    Congratulations! Way to keep wasting money…. YOU WILL NEVER STOP THE SALE OF MARIJUANA!!!!

  • Mac J

    “But with the funding that’s available to them (local law enforcement agencies), it’s still an incentive for them to keep on top of that and to get that information reported to us.”

    DING DING DING. And that pretty much sums up the last 70 years of prohibition. Follow the trail of money. He even says: “We do think with all of the other drug problems in Florida – the pill mills, the meth problems – marijuana sometimes may not be as a high priority in some areas as they are in others”

    So basically what he is saying is: Marijuana may not be a dangerous problem, and it isn’t really a priority, but the government is willing to give lots of money if police agencies are willing to take their focus off dangerous crime and corruption, and start cracking down on pot.

    We all knew this is how it works but for him to actually say it in written form is brazenly…well, Brazen. I guess I can’t disagree with his honesty

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Smith/100003032292085 Mike Smith

    “We do think with all of the other drug problems in Florida – the pill mills, the meth problems – marijuana sometimes may not be as a high priority in some areas as they are in others,” Ivester said. “But with the funding that’s available to them (local law enforcement agencies), it’s still an incentive for them to keep on top of that and to get that information reported to us.”

    So, in other words, pot is not really a problem, but since we have the money, lets spend it on eradicating pot! What a waste of time, resources and money….to eradicate marijuana. This is why we are in such debt and why the war on drugs is such a huge failure. No matter what the cops do, people will never ever stop smoking pot. The smart thing to do is to legalize it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/brian.grimmer Brian Grimmer

    “But with the funding that’s available to them (local law enforcement agencies), it’s still an incentive for them to keep on top of that and to get that information reported to us.”

    That funding needs to be removed.

  • AnnOnaMice

    Well, with everyone else decriminalizing, legalizing medical weed, or even outright legalizing, I guess they have to go where old people, religious, ignorant, and others will still (for now) support or tolerate what they are doing.

  • Matthew Cunningham

    time to refund this police welfare programs

  • http://www.facebook.com/hugh.yonn.7 Hugh Yonn

    The DEA is the last to be trusted. Is that not the entity that approved the ‘prescription
    medicines’ being sold today?

    In 2009, over 26,000 Americans were killed by prescription medications.

    Deaths caused by marijuana: NOT ONE in recorded history.

    Several years ago, I had surgery on my right shoulder. Pain medication was prescribed…”take one capsule every 4 hours.”

    I took one capsule.

    I was down for over 20 hours. When I came to, I felt like I had been hit by a truck. The next time I felt discomfort, I smoked a small amount of marijuana …pain gone, no after effects.

    I threw the pills out.

    Then I wrote:
    Shoulda Robbed a Bank

    My contribution to helping point out just how ludicrous our pot laws truly are.

  • http://www.facebook.com/hugh.yonn.7 Hugh Yonn

    No Federal bureaucracy has ever voluntarily down-sized…and neither will the DEA.
    Their efforts need to be re-directed…maybe, hunt down some real criminals.

    You know…bank robbers, kidnappers, murderers…those kind of folks. But, of course, the pot bust is one of the easiest and safest to make…per the DOJ’s own statistics, the vast majority of drug offenders are non-violent.

    I spent 5 years in Federal Prison for a marijuana offense.
    And I am as harmless as a Beagle puppy.

  • Kelly Coulter

    Legalize Already! What a waste of taxpayers money…taxpayers are the ones who smoke it, they should have a say, don’t you think?!

  • ozzy

    they pay 87% to ivvestigators and rats ? Seems like a lowlife operation paying neighbors to rat on each other ! In other words they are lacking a conscience

 

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