Gainesville residents address concerns of Cabot-Koppers cleanup

By on February 28th, 2013

Gainesville residents shared their concerns during a meeting Wednesday regarding the cleanup of the Cabot-Koppers site.

The 49-acre area, located off Northwest 23rd Avenue, has a history of wood treatment and pine tar and oil production. Some of the byproducts from that industrial process breached containment and contaminated the ground and aquifer underneath.

The meeting was organized by the Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency so they could gather feedback from the public on the consent decree, which is a legal agreement binding property owner Beazer East Inc. to the cleanup of the area.

Michael Cadigan reported for WUFT-TV.

Scott Miller, the EPA’s remedial project manager, said it was important to hear feedback from the community.

“It is not a common event during the consent decree process to hold a public meeting like this, but we thought it was important because there’s a lot of community involvement here — concern — throughout the process all along,” he said.

Gainesville Mayor Craig Lowe hopes the EPA will consider the comments from Wednesday’s meeting for the cleanup.

Some residents wanted cleanup to include the interior of homes. That won’t be part of the decree, however.

“This consent decree does not have all of the remediation that we sought, but at least it is a step forward for the remediation of the site and the most solid development that we’ve seen on this issue since it’s been a problem for Gainesville,” he said.

Miller said the cleanup will cost about $55 million.

“That includes from here going forward,” he said. “That doesn’t include what’s been done today from 1998 to present.”

Miller also added the consent decree ensures Beazer East — not taxpayers — will be responsible for funding the cleanup in its entirety.

If the consent decree is passed, cleanup could begin in late 2013 or early 2014 and could take five years to complete, Miller said.

Samantha Dean wrote this story online.

This entry was posted in Local and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

More Stories in Local

James Bates works on the painting of Mr. Two Bits, one of biggest ones he’s ever done, for the president Fuchs' media room in his barn turned studio. When thinking of ideas, Bates knew that players and coaches come and go so when he thought of Mr. Two Bits, the spirit of the Swamp since the 60s, he knew it was a great idea.

For Gator Sportscaster, Off-Season Studio Is A Barn

Former Florida Gator linebacker James Bates is a jack of all trades. As a husband, sportscaster and former athlete, he has a hidden talent for painting folk art and landscapes.

Scott Tomar, chair of the University of Florida Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science

Chester Shell Elementary School Could Get On-Site Dental Clinic

Chester Shell Elementary School Students may get an on-site dental clinic next year. The University of Florida Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science is in discussions with officials from Alachua County Public Schools to open the clinic in January.

Olivia, a 4-year-old pit bull, greets a passing feline. Olivia was in foster care, but didn't remain there for long because her foster family fell in love with her and adopted her.

Rescue Dogs’ Success Stories Reflect Humane Society’s Goals

  Olivia is a volunteer at UF Health Shands Hospital. She is quite familiar with the protocol; she checks in at the front desk at the beginning of her 2-hour shift, dons her volunteer nametag, listens closely to instructions and […]

Wallace Russell shows Hawthorne resident Fern Stasko how to use shortcuts in Microsoft Word. The Hawthorne Branch Library paired up with the Hawthorne Life Enrichment Center to offer basic computer classes for senior citizens.

Hawthorne Branch Library Offers Computer Classes to Local Seniors

The Hawthorne Branch Library partnered with the Hawthorne Life Enrichment Center to offer a 6-week computer course for senior citizens. The course teaches a variety of topics ranging from Microsoft Word to Internet safety.

(Left) Shannon Boeppler and Joadlain Charles, regulars at Lillian’s Music Store, both enjoy being able to smoke cigarettes indoors. Boeppler said the trend toward ending tobacco smoking indoors is definitely apparent in Gainesville.

More Gainesville Bars Are Banning Smoking

Durty Nelly’s Irish Pun got rid of ashtrays Oct. 1. Ten Gainesville businesses still allow indoor smoking.

Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments