WUFT News

Museum to screen documentary on reducing waste

By on February 26th, 2013

The Florida Museum of Natural History and the University of Florida Office of Sustainability are screening the award-winning documentary “The Clean Bin Project” Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the museum. Admission is free.

In the film, two Canadian filmmakers challenged each other to a competition to produce less waste over one year.

The filmmakers, Grant Baldwin and Jen Rustemeyer, will be at the screening and will take questions from the audience.

Tiffany Ireland, the museum’s education assistant, said the film can inspire the local community to live a waste-free life.

“I think it’s a great way to bring interest and focus onto a global issue,” she said. “A few small changes can actually make big differences.”

Inspired by the competition in the documentary, the Office of Sustainability is planning a campus-wide clean bin challenge this spring.

The competition, called “REthink Your Waste Challenge,” is geared toward students living on campus and will launch at the screening, said Michael Amish, UF Office of Sustainability program assistant.

Students who accumulate the least trash during the week-long challenge will win eco-friendly prizes, according to a university press release.

“We will be asking people to take a look at what they are producing on campus, what they are producing in their lives, and tie it together to figure out how to reduce waste in the community,” Amish said.

This is the first time the documentary is being screened in Florida.

Leila Milgrim wrote this story online. 


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