WUFT News

Public consulted in species conservation

By on February 6th, 2013

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for public input on a series of drafts to preserve about two dozen native wildlife species.

After reading each plan of action for the 23 species, people can comment with their thoughts through March 13. The FWC will take these comments into consideration when it makes its imperiled species management plan.

Claire Sunquist Blunden, stakeholder coordinator for imperiled species management planning, said by opening commentary to the public, the FWC hopes to get feedback from public partners and people who feel they have some insight into how to aid these imperiled species.

“We are looking for assistance. We know we can’t accomplish all the things in the plan by ourselves,” she said. “We also want perspective from the public on how it could impact them or how these plans might affect their daily life.”

Sunquist Blunden said drafts are usually about 300 pages long, but these action plans were cut down to 25 to 30 pages and include glossaries to make it easier for the public to read and understand.

“They are much more approachable and may be easier to read for the general public,” she said.

The first 23 species include 11 birds, five species of fish, four mammals, two reptiles and one amphibian. The FWC hopes to aid 60 species in total.

Sunquist Blunden said after March 13, the next group of species will be discussed, and the third group will be released in April. From June 2013 to Feb. 2014, the plans will be read to look for common strategies and themes, and they will be compiled into a final plan by spring 2014.


This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

Water-Saving Technologies And Conservation Goals Cut Confusion

According to a recent survey, most people are confused about water conservation. Small efforts add up, but awareness of water consumption is most important, according to GRU.


Only a few areas of the Alachua Sink have open-water surfaces. Rangers believe the cooler, dryer weather typical of Florida winters will kill off some of the vegetation growing on the surface.

Paynes Prairie Trail Undergoes Reclamation Project

Construction on the La Chua Trail in Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park began Monday as part of an effort to re-establish the area of Paynes Prairie as a wetland ecosystem.


Florida-Friendly Landscaping Saves Water And Fertilizer

According to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ Center for Public Issues Education (PIE) website, many Floridians are willing to do their part in conserving water.


Unincorporated Citrus County Residents To Lose Some Recycling Services

Some residents in unincorporated parts of Citrus County will see new recycling rules implemented next week.


Kevlar gloves are used by Gainesville’s Northwest Seafood when filleting lionfish in order to protect against the venomous barbs.

If You Can’t Fight Them, Fry Them

Lionfish are being pushed to Florida menus following August regulation changes on the venomous invasive species’ importation. While dangerous to catch, they are easy to eat as conservation efforts try to save the reefs by increasing demand for the destructive fish.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments