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UF Museum of Natural History to host fungi event

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People will have the opportunity to learn more about a diverse group of organisms in a fun atmosphere at the University of Florida Museum of Natural History, which is hosting a fungi information event with scientists Tuesday night as part of its Science Cafe series.

Matthew Smith, an assistant professor at the department of plant pathology at the University of Florida, will present “Fungus Among Us: Knowing the Diversity and Ecology of Fungi.”

“Most people don’t know very much about fungi, and they can’t necessarily identify what is and what isn’t a fungus,” Smith said.

Smith said he will be discussing what a fungus is, the diversity of the organism and its evolutionary history.  He will also discuss the latest scientific research and provide a few local examples of fungi.

Following the presentation, audience members can participate in an open discussion with the scientists.

“The idea is to make it fun and the scientists approachable,” Smith said.

The event is free and starts at 6:30 p.m. at Chef Brothers Custom Catering off of Northwest 34th Street. Smith said he is expecting about 70 people to attend.

“I hope people come out and are ready to talk about some interesting organisms.”

Kristen Morrell edited this story online.

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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