WUFT News

Possible smoky driving conditions

By on January 2nd, 2013

With many people heading back to work today after the New Year’s holiday, the Florida Highway Patrol has at least two smoky locations it wants to warn you about.

In Suwannee county, a 25 acre controlled burn has left some smouldering areas that are continuing to create smoke.  There is also the possibility of fog.  Troopers say the worst area is mile marker 291 on Interstate 10.  They say motorists need to remember to reduce speed and make sure they use low beam headlights.

There is also some smoke causing a problem in Lafayette county.  This fire is a brush fire.  Even though it’s not big, FHP says it could still cause some smoky driving conditions on SR 51, especially arond Chicken Pen Road.


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