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Farmers in Florida turning to social media to reach consumers

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Without social media, one Gainesville farm might not have the land they need.

Travis Mitchell of Florida Organic Growers used an Indiegogo drive to gain support for a farming operation through Porters Community Farm. Mitchell and his colleagues were able to take advantage of an unused local space for growing.

“It was an abandoned lot, and the owner of it was open to something being done with it,” Mitchell said. “He’s leasing it to us for free.”

They donate most of the food grown to St. Francis House.

Julie Metheney of Citizens Co-Op in Gainesville uses social media to connect with local supermarkets to sell goods.

“We’ll post pictures of farmers coming in with their fresh arugula or whatever it is, and it’s nice to let people have an inside look into the store to see what’s going on.”

Citizens Co-Op works with more than 160 local producers to help boost their supply. They can connect with many of those online.

The AgChat Foundation also helps farmers nationwide learn how to reach consumers and markets using Facebook, Twitter and blogs.

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a journalist at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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