Home / Public safety / Sheriff: Only officers should have guns in Alachua County schools

Sheriff: Only officers should have guns in Alachua County schools

By

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Since Friday’s shooting in Newtown, Conn., lawmakers and residents across the country are bringing up the issue of gun control in schools. The tragedy has school and law enforcement officials reconsidering safety plans for emergencies.

Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell said her office will be working even closer with Alachua County public schools after meeting with Superintendent Dan Boyd.

“One of our priorities in 2013 is an emphasis on safety for our children in our schools. We have a very productive and ambitious plan to work on during the first part of the year,” Darnell said. “It builds on a good commitment of high security, good collaboration among our law enforcement and school personnel.”

Darnell said safety procedures are already in place at schools, and 14 of Alachua County’s public schools have resource officers.

“Drills and training and sharing information and communicating risk assessment among our (sheriff’s office) staff and school staff has been going on for years.”

Sheriff Darnell said she would like to increase the number of resource officers in schools if there are adequate funds.

The discussion of safety in schools has also brought up the issue of gun control. While some are advocating for school administrators to become armed, Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell said guns belong in the hands of law enforcement.

“Law enforcement goes through a tremendous level of training, so right now I’m comfortable only with law enforcement at this point having operation and control of guns in the school.”

About Cameron Taylor

Cameron is a reporter for WUFT News and can be contacted by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

Check Also

FILE - In this Sunday, June 12, 2016 file photo, law enforcement officials work at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., following the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history. More police departments are exploring technology that would allow 911 emergency dispatchers to receive text messages from people who need help. When gunshots rang out at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando in June, patrons hid from the gunman and frantically texted relatives to call 911 because Orlando doesn't have 911 texting. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

Nightclub Shooting Police Reports: Hysteria, Blood, Bodies

Dozens of narratives in supplemental police reports released Tuesday give greater details about the Orlando police response to last month's massacre of 49 patrons at the Pulse gay nightclub, the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history. The officers who recount their role in the reports were the initial responders to a call from a fellow officer who was working security when gunman Omar Mateen began firing in the club.