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Yoho says no to signing no-tax pledge


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The threat of the American economy falling off the fiscal cliff is on the minds of citizens and politicians alike.

Florida Congressman-elect, Ted Yoho did not sign the Taxpayer Protection Pledge written by lobbyist Grover Norquist and said signing the no-tax pledge would have left him too strictly bound to do his job the right way.

“Signing a pledge is not going to fix our debt problems, our financial woes in this country,” Yoho said in a interview with NPR Wednesday. “If you sign a pledge like that, you’ve got handcuffs on.”

The Republican added that he made no pledges to voters during his campaign.

Although Yoho said he does not think America has a tax revenue problem or that raising taxes is the way to fix the economy, he said that he would change his stance on raising taxes if the money were used to reduce the national debt.

“If we did a good job and we felt like we were in the right direction and getting control of that and becoming more efficient as a government,” Yoho said, “and you looked at the situation and we’re still revenue short, then I think anyone in their right mind would say ‘Yeah, I’m giving a little bit provided the government spends it the way it should be to pay off our debt.”

Emily Miller edited this story online.

About Matt Sheehan

Matt can be reached by calling 352-392-6397 or emailing news@wuft.org.

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  • Alachua George Washington

    He did pledge to term-limit himself. Limited himself to 8 years. He went on the record over and over. Said he even signed a document. … Good for him avoiding the tax pledge!