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Regional workforce connection cautions against job ad fraud

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Getting a job just got trickier.

The Workforce Connection of Citrus, Levy and Marion Counties is now warning jobseekers to stay alert for scams using the names of legitimate businesses and organizations.

Workforce Connection CEO Rusty Skinner said the regional board decided to issue the warning after receiving tips from other workforce boards.

Laura Brynes, the workforce’s spokeswoman, said jobseekers must watch out for signs of scamming.

“If you see any claims of guaranteed employment or any requests of up-front fees to get a job, you know, you might say to yourself, ‘I don’t think that might be a legitimate job offer,’” she said. “Somebody thinks that they’re responding to a legitimate ad and they find out they have to pay money and then they never get a job. So we’re just trying to alert jobseekers to be on their toes.”

Brynes said the “impostures” post job openings in the same places traditional employment opportunities are advertised.

She cautioned against companies claiming “no experience is necessary” for their jobs.

“You need to research the company to make sure it’s the real deal,” she said.

Visit the Better Business Bureau online at www.bbb.org to research companies posting job ads.

Brynes encouraged possible scam victims to call the attorney general’s fraud hotline at 866-966-7226.

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