Home / Florida / Local political party chairmen weigh in on the third, and final, presidential debate

Local political party chairmen weigh in on the third, and final, presidential debate


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The third and final presidential debate ended Monday night, kicking off the final two weeks until Election Day.

While the second debate let Gov. Romney go “viral” with his “binders full of women” quote, it was President Obama who claimed the King of Zingers title last night.

“You mentioned the Navy, for example — that we have fewer ships than we did in 1916,” said Obama. “Well, Governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets, because the nature of our military’s changed. We have these things called aircraft carriers, where planes land… we have ships that go underwater — nuclear submarines. And so the question is not a game of ‘Battleship,’ where we’re counting ships.”

Although audience members of the debate, held at Lynn University in Boca Raton, were instructed to remain silent, many couldn’t contain their laughter.

While the “horses and bayonets” line created a stir both in the auditorium and on the Internet, many more people were concerned about what was not discussed during the debate; the topic of Monday night’s debate was foreign policy issues.

“Certainly Latin America is essential to the Florida economy and to the United States as a whole,” said former U.S. Rep. Robert Wexler. He said that the focus on other parts of the world might be a good thing, but that we shouldn’t ignore South and Central America.

About 9,000 visitors came to South Florida for the debate. Susan Whelchel, the mayor of Boca Raton, said that during the last week alone, about $5 to $6 million was brought into the city’s economy due to debate-related activities.

She also said that the “free PR” from the media to South Florida is also in the millions.

The chairman of the Lake County Republican Party, Michael Levine, said that more media coverage might not be positive; the media tends to paint a biased picture of the candidates.

“We do tend to view these debates through our own eyes,” said Levine, “which concerns me a little bit, that I might be prejudiced.”

“I think the American people had a great opportunity to see Mitt Romney for who he is as opposed to who the Obama administration is painting him to be,” Levine said.

Because of what Americans have seen of Romney, the chairman of the Alachua County Democratic Party, John Reiskind, said they should want to vote for Obama even more.

“Gov. Romney changed his message to fit the time,” said Reiskind, “and he has had an inconsistent message.”

Levine’s primary concern is the “Romney/Ryan ticket,” but he wanted to remind voters to continue to vote Republican at the local level.

No matter how voters choose, Reiskind advised that they do their proper research first.

“Listen to what the candidates say, visit those webpages, and read as much as you can on their positions,” Reiskind said.

“I personally believe that Americans will take a giant step toward an economic recovery,” Levine said, as he hopes he will wake up to a Republican-filled Senate and House of Representatives, as well as the executive seat.

Regardless of party affiliation, every vote does count.

Sami Main wrote this story for online.

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