WUFT News

Smart phone damage caused by frequent usage

By on October 18th, 2012

With more cellphones running on the latest technology, they are not only getting flashier but more vulnerable.

Aside from bigger screens and slicker phones, the reason why phones tend to break more than in the past is because people can’t let them go.

Ty Shay, Chief Marketing Officer for SquareTrade, an independent warranty provider, said the reason why more devices are breaking is because they are being used more often.

“These devices have become like our third hand,” he said.

SquareTrade recently surveyed 2,000 iPhones users and found that 51 percent of devices that break occur in the house. Eighteen percent of those accidents happen inside the kitchen, Shay said.

Mike Vorce, owner of ReTech SmartPhone Repair Centers in Gainesville, echoed Shay, agreeing that frequent usage makes breaking phones inevitable.

“There’s so many thing you can practically do with the phone that it’s kind of gotten into people’s lifestyle,” he said. “They get used to using and depending on it.”

The increase in accidents has also created new business outlets.

Vorce said with insurance plans on carriers, national warranty services and local stores, smart phone users have a lot more options to fix their phones.

“It becomes more important for them to get something done, get it repaired and get it operational again,” he said.


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