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Missing Korean War soldier remains returned to Gainesville

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A black-and-white photograph of Capt. Turnace H. Brown

After going missing during the Korean War almost 60 years ago, the remains of Capt. Turnace H. Brown are finally back home in Gainesville.

Recent DNA tests identified Brown, and a motorcade Thursday brought his remains to the Milam Funeral & Cremation Services.

Several people lined up, American flags in hand, and waited for the motorcade’s arrival.

The car also carried Brown’s family members who spoke to the public about him and shared old pictures.

Jean Brown Lunsford, Brown’s only remaining sister, spoke about her reaction when the news first arrived that her brother’s remains had been identified.

“To me, it’s amazing that after 60 years, they can identify somebody through DNA,” she said.

Smiles and teary eyes filled the room as attendees passed around the photographs and listened to stories of the man they described only with positive words.

Brown’s daughter, Nancy Archibald, was only 5 years old when her father went missing in action.

Archibald said that while she didn’t know her father well, there was a sense of closure during Thursday’s event.

Despite all the time that has passed since Brown went missing, Lunsford said she never brought herself to believe he was actually gone.

She said she held out hope that her brother’s body would one day be found.

“I never gave up hope,” Lunsford said. “Even right now, if they had not identified these bones I’d still would not have given up hope.”

Brown will be laid to rest on Friday at Forest Meadows Cemetery-East where his parents are also buried.

Chris Alcantara and George Pappas edited this story online.

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