WUFT News

African American clergy express views on 2012 election

By and on September 19th, 2012

As Election Day approaches, religion seems to be dominating many debates. Religious groups across the country are measuring their own values against those of the presidential candidates – one who openly supports gay marriage and another who practices a religion some consider controversial.

Some African American clergy across the country have told congregations to stay home on Election Day, which could be unfortunate news for President Barack Obama.

The Rev. Milford Griner of Plain United Methodist Church in Newberry, said he holds his personal values in high regard, but he draws the line at telling his congregation to stay away from the polls.

“I think that is wrong for pastors to tell members not to vote at all,” Griner said. “In the history of our country especially, for blacks in particular, there’s been too much bloodshed, too many lives lost and too much has happened, especially for black people, for us to not even go to the polls to vote.”

Griner said that although he does not support Obama’s stance on same-sex marriage, he will vote for him again in the 2012 election – but this decision is not based on Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s Mormonism.

“I don’t have any issue with his religion,” Griner said. “That’s his religion and I respect his, just like I would expect him to respect mine as a Methodist.”

In fact, as a Methodist pastor, Griner is not allowed to recommend a presidential candidate from the pulpit.

“The only thing I’m doing as a pastor is encouraging my congregation to vote. How they vote and who they vote for is up to them.”

Sara Drumm edited this story online.


This entry was posted in Politics and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Politics

Photographed is city councilman Adam Prins.

Live Oak Mayor’s Dispute With Councilman Finally Settled

The State of Florida Commission on Ethics decided sufficient probable cause did not exist in eight of nine allegations against Live Oak city councilman Adam Prins. The initial complaint against Prins was filed by Live Oak Mayor Sonny Nobles Jr.


IMG_0659

Alachua County Voters Reject Sales Surtax for Transportation Funding

Despite support from a range of institutions, voters struck down the one-cent sales surtax increase in Alachua County that would improve transportation, leaving the City of Gainesville and the Regional Transit System of Gainesville to reassess their plans and look for alternative sources of funding.


Medical marijuana remains illegal in the state of Florida. Amendment 2 was three percentage points away from the super-majority required to pass.

Amendment 2 Fails: Medical Marijuana Remains Illegal In Florida

Amendment 2 was rejected by voters after it received 57 percent of the required 60 percent to pass.


Alachua County, Florida, election worker Georganne Eibe (right) teaches a volunteer how to work election equipment on Monday.

Alachua County Prepares For Election Day

Elections workers prepared for Election Day on Monday. They packed up supplies to distribute across the county and taught new volunteers how to work the equipment.


Charlie Crist spoke at UF on Wednesday. He touched on the importance of voting and education policy in his speech.

UF College Democrats Rally in Support of Charlie Crist on Campus

Members of the community gathered in Pugh Hall on Wednesday to support Charlie Crist in the 2014 gubernatorial election.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments