WUFT News

Steps at Poe Springs will take more time

By on September 18th, 2012

Summer is coming to a close, and Poe Springs still does not have its steps. Delays resulted after water levels rose too high for construction to continue.

Bob Barnas, the vice mayor of High Springs , said the delays in constructing a concrete staircase resulted after Tropical Storm Debby and other storms caused the water to rise. The steps were supposed to be completed by the end of May.

There had been an agreement that High Springs would take over control of Poe Springs. Barnas said that High Springs backed out of the agreement because it was revealed that the steps would be under construction after the budget had already been approved.

High Springs asked Alachua County for a delay in taking over until the steps were completed.

Robert Avery, the parks superintendent for Alachua County, said they are currently at a standstill of how to move forward with the steps.

“Analyzing whether we want to do another series of pre-fabricated steps and, or take a little more time and see if the water is going to recede,” Avery said.

The high water levels do not allow for concrete to be poured at the site. Pre-fabricated stairs would require a large crane for placement in the area.

A decision about another agreement is likely to be made after the November election, according to Barnas. Three votes are needed for approval.

“Depending on the makeup of the new commission, that’s what will dictate whether we go forward,” Barnas said.

However, Barnas said that the commission has recently finished budget talks. All the line items for Poe Springs are still in the budget, but there are no dollar amounts associated with the items at this time.

Barnas also made it clear that the park is still open, even though the springs are not.

Cassandra Vangellow edited this story online.


This entry was posted in Environment, Florida, Local and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

The invasive air potato vine has met its match with the introduction of the air potato leaf beetle. This beetle could control the aggressive plant.

Air Potato Beetle Becomes Big Help To Florida Farmers

With the controlled release of the air potato leaf beetle in Florida and around the U.S., the aggressive air potato vine finally has a predator.


Attendance at Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park increased by more than 100,000 visitors in the 2012-2013 fiscal year.

US Forest Service Proposes Requirements for Photography in Wilderness Areas

The U.S. Forest Service has proposed a rule that would require media to get a permit before filming or photographing in wilderness areas, or else face a fine. The proposed rule has been met with opposition on the grounds that it violates First Amendment rights.


Water-Saving Technologies And Conservation Goals Cut Confusion

According to a recent survey, most people are confused about water conservation. Small efforts add up, but awareness of water consumption is most important, according to GRU.


Only a few areas of the Alachua Sink have open-water surfaces. Rangers believe the cooler, dryer weather typical of Florida winters will kill off some of the vegetation growing on the surface.

Paynes Prairie Trail Undergoes Reclamation Project

Construction on the La Chua Trail in Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park began Monday as part of an effort to re-establish the area of Paynes Prairie as a wetland ecosystem.


Florida-Friendly Landscaping Saves Water And Fertilizer

According to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ Center for Public Issues Education (PIE) website, many Floridians are willing to do their part in conserving water.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments