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On the second day, lines still seen for Obama ticket distribution


By Marc Whiteman – WUFT-FM

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It’s barely been 24 hours since people learned Michelle Obama is coming to the University of Florida and lines for tickets were still packed this morning. Students lined up as early as 10 a.m. for yesterday’s 6 p.m. ticket distribution and were out in droves again today, hoping for a ticket to hear the First Lady speak.

Jonathan Brooks, a UF student, has already heard Mrs. Obama speak, but that won’t stop him from seeing her again.

“I was a volunteer and so I went to go see her,” Brooks said. “I thought it was a once-in-a-lifetime chance, but I guess it’s twice-in-a-lifetime.”

But it wasn’t just students clamoring to see Mrs. Obama — Gainesville residents were out for tickets too, something Gainesville City Commissioner Susan Bottcher was very aware of.

“What I’m seeing today is a lot of enthusiasm, there’s a long line outside the O’Connell Center here of people waiting to get tickets.” Bottcher said. “What impressed me is it’s not just students.”

Local Democrats expect Obama’s appearance to “fire up” supporters, as well as generate voting interest ahead of November’s election. And at 3:30 Monday afternoon, thousands of Gainesville eyes and ears will be directed at the First Lady of the United States.

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