WUFT News

Fall and winter season seeds available through local seed library

By on September 14th, 2012

Gardeners preparing for the fall and winter growing season can purchase seeds from a local source — the Grow Gainesville seed library — this Saturday.

The fall and winter season seed distribution is from noon to 3 p.m. on Saturday at Highlands Presbyterian Church, 1001 NE 16th Ave. Distributions occur at the beginning of the spring and fall seasons and there is no limit to the number of seeds you can go home with.

Grow Gainesville’s seed library caters to local gardeners seeking seasonal vegetable, flower, herb and cover crop seeds. Melissa Desa, co-founder of the local, urban gardening network said the library was started to provide gardeners with more diversified and cheaper seeds.

“Our long-term goal is to teach people how to save seeds and get them back into the library, so we can have a local seed source,” she said.

A suggested annual $20 donation is requested for access to the seed library. Desa said about 200 people have donated to the library. Gardeners can make a donation at the event.

Faith Carr, Grow Gainesville member, said this will be her second growing season using seeds from the library.

“I believe it’s very important that people get as knowledgeable about growing food as possible,” she said.

Gardeners who are unable to attend the distribution can purchase seeds by making an appointment. For more information and a complete list of this season’s available seeds, visit www.growgainesville.wordpress.com.


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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=534099743 Faith Carr

    If you missed your opportunity to get some fall/winter seeds for your veggie gardens Grow Gainesville will be doing another distribution in October. Cool weather veggie seeds can be planted through the fall.

    Join the group over on the FaceBook. We can get you growing.

  • Pat McCarthy

    I love the seeds, but also the advice, support for new gardeners, and fun at the distribution!

 

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