WUFT News

FAMU president resigning immediately

By on July 16th, 2012

Florida A&M University President James Ammons is stepping down immediately after the school’s board voted to pay him more than $100,000 dollars in bonuses in exchange for leaving sooner. Ammons is the latest to resign in the wake of a hazing scandal and administrative problems plaguing the school but he may not be the last. University Trustee Torey Alson says there are more people who need to go too:

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FAMU has appointed Provost Larry Robinson to serve as interim president until a new one can be found. Robinson’s appointment will be confirmed by the school’s board at its next meeting. FAMU is facing a wrongful death lawsuit by the family of the band member hazed to death.

Meanwhile, Chief Communication Officer for Florida A & M University, Sharon Saunders, says she believes Ammons made the right decision both personally and for FAMU.

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As part of the deal, Ammons was paid more than $100,000 dollars in bonuses in exchange for a speedy resignation. Saunders says the money was part of a contract set before the hazing incident.

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Although Ammons will no longer be president, Saunders says he will remain an employee of FAMU.

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FAMU’s Provost Larry Robinson will now serve as interim president at Florida A & M, and Saunders says he is a great replacement for the present time.

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Saunders added although the board of trustees has set a meeting to discuss a replacement for the president in August, there is no word yet on who is being considered to take his place long-term.

Lynn Hatter of Florida Public Radio contributed to this report.


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