WUFT News

Live Oak still picking up the pieces after Debby

By on July 12th, 2012

Weeks after Tropical Storm Debby hit, the city of Live Oak is still putting itself back together after a lot of standing water was left after the storm. City of Live Oak Mayor Garth Nobles says even though some things are getting back to normal, there are still new problems the city is dealing with. 

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According to Nobles sinkhole problems are showing up downtown.   

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Among the biggest problems Nobles says the city is dealing with are the lift stations used to move the town’s sewage.   

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Nobles says the town is now focusing on cleanup.  

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Nobles says Live Oak was recently approved for funding from FEMA to assist local residents and businesses with repairs.  He says already the number of people that have applied for for assistance is quite high.   

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He adds the city of Live Oak should still expect flooding.   

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As the FEMA funding money comes in Nobles says he hopes residents will use the money for what it is meant for.

 


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