WUFT News

Tropical Storm Debby drenching Florida’s west coast

By on June 24th, 2012

The National Weather Service and National Hurricane Center report coastal areas of North Central Florida will receive several inches of rain over the next 24 hours as Tropical Storm Debby continues on a NE track in the Gulf of Mexico.  The exact track of the storm is still a bit unpredictable.  Debby is producing tropical-storm-force winds and heavy rains along portions of the Northeast Gulf Coast. At 10:00 a.m. Tropical Storm Debby was located at 28.0 North and 86.2 West or about 140 miles South Southwest of Apalachicola.    Maximum sustained winds are at 60 mph.  The present movement is to the Northeast at 6 mph.  A tropical storm warning has been extended eastward along the Northwest coast of Florida to the Suwannee River and a tropical storm watch has been issued south of the Suwannee River to Anclote Key.

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.  A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area…in this case within 12 to 24 hours.

The combination of a storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters.  The water could reach the following depths above ground if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide: Southeastern Louisiana eastward through Apalachee Bay, 3 to 5 feet.  Florida’s west coast south of Apalachee Bay, 1 to 3 feet.  Southwestern Louisiana, 1 to 3 feet.  The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast in areas of onshore flow.  Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge and the tidal cycle and can vary greatly over short distances.

Tropical Storm Debby is expected to produce rain accumulations of 5 to 10 inches along the immediate Gulf Coast from Southeast Louisiana to the Central West Coast of Florida with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches.  Given the recent heavy rainfall and wet soil conditions, these additional amounts will exacerbate the flash flood threat across portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf Coast.

Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of the West-Central and Southwestern Florida peninsula today.  Keep checking with WUFT.org throughout the day for updates.


This entry was posted in Environment, Florida, Local and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
 

More Stories in Environment

Oak Hall High School volunteers remove the wooden fence that Bevelle Creek’s previous owners built to stabilize the shoreline. The fence was removed to allow access to the creek during the restoration project.

Beville Creek Restoration Project Underway

The city of Gainesville closed Cofrin Nature Park in order to complete a restoration project on Beville Creek. The goal of the project is to repair the eroding shoreline and provide new areas to the creek where wildlife can gather. The park is slated to reopen sometime in the fall.


Suwannee

Suwannee Lake Renovations Still Progressing

Almost two years after the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission closed Suwannee Lake to the public for renovations, some of the changes are now visible. For almost 50 years, the lake has provided a natural habitat for wildlife in […]


Barr Hammock Preserve is the most recent area where bear-human conflict has occurred in Alachua County. No one was injured in the June incident.

Experts Caution Against Bear Hunting in Alachua County

The Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission met yesterday to review a proposal which would allow bear hunting on specific areas throughout Florida. Wildlife groups question if hunting is the solution to an increasing number of bear encounters.


Swamp Head Brewery, with the help of the University of Florida's Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences department, released 300 bluegills into what will soon become a self-sustaining wetlands. Photo courtesy of Brandon Nappy.

Swamp Head Brewery Introduces Species to New Conservation

When Swamp Head Brewery moved into their new location, off Southwest 34th Street in Gainesville, in January, they saved one acre of their land for conservation. The brewery is working toward creating an environment that is reflective of their tasting room, “The Wetlands.”


Alachua County Fire Rescue Station #25 is one of the government

buildings that is getting a solar roof installed. After assessing the buildings, 24 were approved. Rebecca Rubin / WUFT News

Fire Station Is First Building In Hawthorne To Get Solar Overhaul

Alachua County Fire Rescue Station 25 will be the first county building in Hawthorne to be outfitted with solar panels. The station is one of 24 buildings determined viable for the county’s solar panel initiative, which seeks to cut energy consumption.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments