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Salinity in Cedar Key: bad for drinking water, good for clams

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Cedar Key residents lined up on Wednesday to receive jugs of fresh drinking water.  Saltwater intrusion into the city’s wellfield caused by the drought has city and health officials working for a solution.  Meanwhile, the key industry that fuels the Cedar Key community is thriving.  Clam farming has had a 45-million dollar impact on the coastal communities around Cedar Key.  Florida’s 89.1, WUFT-FM’s Donna Green-Townsend talked with aquaculture extension agent Leslie Sturmer about how the saltier conditions are giving clam farmers a bumper crop.

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