Home / Health and Science / Sexual Assault Victims are Painting a Path to Recovery

Sexual Assault Victims are Painting a Path to Recovery

By

 

Some victims of sexual assault are using a unique art form to find a way to heal.  Florida’s 89.1, WUFT-FM’s Nickelle Smith reports during sexual assault awareness month a local art exhibit is showcasing a medium sexual assault victims can use on their road to recovery.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The U.S. Department of Justice’s National Crime Victimization Survey reports that every two minutes, someone in the United States is sexually assaulted. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month.  In recognition, Alachua County Victim Services and Rape Crisis Center is hosting a ‘Survivors Art Exhibit.’ A showcase of art created by sexual assault victims to help them heal. It took Santa Fe College Psychology Professor Theresa Foster 25 years to begin healing after being assaulted.

Foster says she did not have the words to express herself after being assaulted at such a young age but a box of crayons helped release those feelings years later.  Support groups where victims verbally expressed themselves were helpful to Foster but she says her memory was flooded with images that needed to be released as well.

Alachua County Sexual Account Program Manager Rita Lawrence says some victims are hesitant to use art as a way to heal because they doubt their own skills.

Santa Fe College student Anne-Marie Ware was also assaulted at a young age and says art was also a way to tap into feelings she kept bottled for years.

Ware says it’s the personal attachment to one’s art piece that she thinks makes visual art so therapeutic.

Theresa Foster says her art is like a roadmap of her path to recovery.  The Survivors Art Exhibit will be on display in the Alachua County Community Support Services Lobby at 618 Southeast 24th Street now through April 30th.

About Front Page Edition

Check Also

Diane Spicer, a pathologists’ assistant and the current caretaker of the Van Mierop heart collection, sorts through a few of the hundreds of jars that compose the archive housed at the UF Health Shands Hospital. The collection, which receives minimal funding, acts as an educational tool for medical personnel and a research opportunity for pathologists worldwide. (Brittany Valencic/WUFT News)

The Van Mierop Heart Archive at UF Struggles to Keep Beating

One of the largest collections of donated hearts, UF's Van Mierop Heart Collection is running low on space and funds.