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Florida bird watchers got a treat this winter season

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The most recent survey of wintering bird activity has shown seasonal climate change is not just coming, it may already be here. Florida Audubon Society Wildlife Conservation Director Julie Wraithmel says bird migration patterns are good indications of the climate situation, like temperature patterns.

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The results of the national Great Backyard Bird Count were recently released showing warmer states like Florida, Texas and California saw more bird activity than the rest of the nation, and the birds also spread to states they have never gone to before. This could indicate warming temperatures and a sustained change in climate.  Wraithmel says it’s important to look closely at wintering habitats because those are locations where birds will reenergize before returning to breed.

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She says the results of this study will be pieced together with data from prior years to uncover both state wide and national trends.

About Ethan Magoc

Ethan is a news editor at WUFT News. He's a Pennsylvania native who found a home reporting Florida's stories. Reach him by emailing emagoc@wuft.org or calling 352-294-1525.

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