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Two students at center of controversy leaving Gainesville High School

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The two Gainesville High School students who posted a second viral video on YouTube will no longer attend the school.

The second video they posted shows two Gainesville High School students responding to messages they call hate mail that are in reponse to the girls’ first offensive video. While the girls answer this “hate mail,” they talk very negatively about African- Americans, mimicking a dialect.

Gainesville High School Principal David Shellnut says he heard of the video Wednesday afternoon, which then led to a meeting first thing Thursday morning with teachers staff to alert them of the video. He also talked to students himself.

A few more officers were on campus Thursday as a safety precaution. Shellnut says he thinks this video will serve as a learning example of what teachers continually tell their students about social media.

A spokesperson for the school district, Jackie Johnson, said the district could not take action since the videos were produced off campus.  And while principal Shellnut wouldn’t say if any disciplinary action would be taken towards the girls, he did say the students would not be attending GHS, but would not say why, or where they would attend school.

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