Home / News from NPR / ‘Apparently’ This Is The Funniest 5-Year-Old In America
"I don't watch the news because I'm a kid," Noah Ritter, 5, said in an interview at the Wayne County Fair in Pennsylvania. He went on to show that he belongs on TV.

‘Apparently’ This Is The Funniest 5-Year-Old In America

By Bill Chappell NPR

We can’t resist passing along the phenomenon that is Noah Ritter, a young man who’s taking the Internet by storm. The 5-year-old’s interview at Pennsylvania’s Wayne County Fair is a wonder of stream-of-consciousness, sprinkled heavily with one word: “apparently.”

Cutting a striking figure with his red hair and a green-and-white shirt, Noah quickly takes the microphone from WNEP TV 16’s Sofia Ojeda to deliver a monologue that’s only briefly interrupted by the reporter’s questions.

“I’ve never been on live television before,” Noah says, staring unblinkingly into the camera.

“I don’t watch the news because I’m a kid,” he continues, “and apparently … grandpa just gives me the remote after we watch the Powerball.”

Noah’s delivery — his ability to finish a sentence with relish and certainty, even when he’s discussing how a ride freaked him out — left Ojeda, and many viewers, laughing. When he was done, a round of high-fives ensued.

The initial interview with the boy took place Friday; WNEP did a follow-up with Noah today, after his performance drew national interest — including an appearance on Good Morning America.

“Everything’s been overwhelming,” Noah’s grandfather Jack Borowski tells WNEP. “We went to the fair and we got interviewed and everything unraveled from there.”

The station also asks Noah, who lives in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., where he’d learned the word “apparently.”

“I don’t know, from my mom, maybe?” he says.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Check Also

President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington.

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.