Nation & World News

Typhoon Batters Chinese Island, Heads For Vietnam

By Alan Greenblatt on July 18th, 2014

The strongest typhoon to hit China in years battered the island of Hainan on Friday.

Typhoon Rammasun killed 54 people as it passed across parts of the Philippines Wednesday and gained strength as it crossed the South China Sea.

It was categorized as a super typhoon by China and has had winds in excess of 130 mph. The city of Haikou has had seven inches of rain in six hours, reports CNN meteorologist Brandon Miller.

Floods and mudslides are a major concern — as they are in Vietnam, where authorities began evacuating more than 118,000 people in the country’s northern provinces in preparation for Rammasun’s expected arrival Saturday.

The storm has been blamed for one death in China thus far. The Chinese news agency Xinhua is reporting that a man died in the town of Wengtian after being struck by debris as his house collapsed in the storm.

More than 26,000 people on Hainan were evacuated, The Associated Press reports. Hainan is sometimes referred to as “China’s Hawaii” and resorts, ferries, tour buses and trains have suspended operations.

“On the nearby mainland, the typhoon will also affect southwestern Guangdong province and southeastern Guangxi province,” USA Today reports. “The National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center forecast storm surges bringing waves of up to 20 feet in coastal Guangdong.”

The storm has also brought high winds and rain to Hong Kong, which is northeast of Hainan.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

ISIS Affiliate Claims Responsibility For Suicide Attack In Saudi Arabia

The bombing of a Shiite mosque killed at least 19 people. The claim of responsibility is a first for the extremist group involving an attack inside the kingdom.


Josh Brones, president of the California Houndsmen for Conservation, walks his hunting dogs, Dollar, left, Sequoia, center and Tanner right, near his home in Wilton, Calif., in 2012.

Who Let The Dogs In? We Did, About 30,000 Years Ago

A new study suggests that canis familiaris split from wolves much earlier than the 11,000 to 16,000 years ago that was long assumed.


Sprinklers water a lawn in Sacramento, Calif.

#NPRReads: Social Concern And The Drought In California

Also this week, a profile of plus-sized model Tess Holliday, algorithms in plain(ish) English, and suicide clusters in Palo Alto, Calif.


The State Department is releasing 296 emails from Hillary Clinton's email account during her tenure as secretary of state. The correspondence relates to the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

State Department Releases Clinton Emails

The department released the first batch of 296 emails from the former secretary of state’s email accounts, which were provided to the Select Committee on Benghazi in February.


A bird covered in oil flaps its wings at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif., on Thursday. More than 9,000 gallons of oil has been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast, just a fraction of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline, officials said.

Pipeline Operator: Possibly Months To Determine Cause Of Calif. Spill

Plains All American, the company that operates the pipeline, says it has yet to uncover the problem. So far, 9,000 gallons of sludge have been removed from a 9-mile stretch near Santa Barbara.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments