Nation & World News

U.S. Embassy Officers Shot, Killed 2 Armed Individuals In Yemen

By Eyder Peralta on May 10th, 2014

Two U.S. embassy officers in Yemen shot and killed two armed men in Sanaa last month.

“The Embassy officers are no longer in Yemen,” State Department spokesperson Marie Harf said in a written statement. “Per standard procedure for any such incident involving embassy officers overseas, this matter is under review.”

Harf added that the officers fired because the armed individuals were attempting to kidnap them.

This news matters because an incident of this kind has the potential to inflame tensions with a key U.S. ally on the war on terror. If you remember, back in 2011, CIA contractor Raymond Davis killed two men in Lahore, Pakistan. He was detained and eventually released, but the incident sparked anti-American protests and strained diplomatic relations.

Quoting an unnamed U.S. official, The New York Times reports one of the Americans in the Yemen case worked for the elite Joint Special Operations Command and the other was a CIA officer. It’s unclear what they were doing at the time of the shootings.

The killings, the paper reports, also come at a tenuous time for Yemen. The Times explains:

“News of the shootings comes at a perilous moment for the government of President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi, whose collaboration with American drone strikes against suspected members of Al Qaeda is already a subject of seething resentment in Yemen. Yemenis believe, with some evidence, that the drone strikes often kill nearby civilians as well as their targets, so any indication that Mr. Hadi’s government helped conceal the killing of Yemenis by American commandos could be problematic.

“Violence in the country is increasing, and on Friday, militants attacked a checkpoint outside the presidential palace, apparently in retaliation for the government’s roughly 10-day offensive against Qaeda strongholds.”

The Times identifies the two men as Yemeni citizens, but a spokesman for the Yemeni Embassy in Washington, D.C., would not confirm the nationalities of those involved in the incident.

NPR’s Hansi Lo Wang reports the spokesman did identify the suspected kidnappers as members of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win game seven of the 2014 World Series.

Is It Too Early To Call Madison Bumgarner A Legend?

The San Francisco Giants’ pitcher delivered a performance for the ages Wednesday night. And the sports world just can’t stop talking about it.


This undated photo of Eric Frein was released Tuesday by Pennsylvania State Police. Frein, 31, had been sought in connection with September's killing of a state trooper and the critical wounding of another.

Eric Frein, Suspected Of Killing Pennsylvania Trooper, In Custody

Police say Frein opened fire on two state troopers more than a month ago, and they’ve been searching for him since. The Pike County district attorney says he intends to seek the death penalty.


In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks on Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross.

Red Cross Responds To NPR/ProPublica Report On Storm Response Inefficiencies

An NPR investigation revealed how the emergency organization funneled its resources away from storm victims to create an “illusion of mass care.” The Red Cross tells PBS NewsHour that’s not true.


Sweden Recognizes Palestine, Drawing Sharp Israeli Criticism

Israel’s foreign minister says diplomacy is “more complicated than … furniture from Ikea.” His Swedish counterpart responds that diplomacy, like Ikea furniture, needs “a partner … [and] a manual.”


A 2009 photo of Boston Mayor Tom Menino, who served for 20 years before stepping down this year. He died on Thursday.

Thomas Menino, Boston’s Longest-Serving Mayor, Dies At 71

Described as a hard-nosed, old-school pragmatist, he was diagnosed with cancer shortly after leaving office in January.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments