Nation & World News

45 People Were Shot In Chicago Over The Weekend

By Mark Memmott on April 22nd, 2014

There are more data to add to Chicago’s well-documented problem with gun violence.

Headlines such as this from the Chicago Sun-Times — “In violent weekend, at least 8 dead, 37 wounded in shootings across Chicago” — set us off in search of news reports after previous weekends.

There’s a rather grim trend. Shootings are on the rise:

— “At least 36 people have been shot, four of them killed … in Chicago violence since Friday.” (NBC Chicago on April 14)

— “27 People Shot In Chicago This Weekend, Including 16-Year-Old In Front Of His Church.” (The Huffington Post’s Black Voices blog, on April 7)

As our colleagues at WBEZ have reported, Chicago’s lawmakers have toughened the city’s gun laws.

But The Daily Beast notes that Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy says that while his officers have seized 1,500 illegal guns so far this year, “it’s like running on a hamster wheel. … We’re drinking from a fire hose, seizing these guns, and people are back out on the street.”

Part of the explanation for the weekly increase in weekend shootings, authorities say, is the shift from winter to spring that apparently brings out the worst in some people.

Many of the shootings are gang-related, police say. According to the Chicago Tribune, among this past weekend’s incidents was one in which:

“Five children, ranging in age from 11 to 15, were shot by someone who fired from a car shortly after 7:30 p.m. Sunday in the 6600 block of South Michigan Avenue in the Park Manor neighborhood on the South Side, police said.

“The children had been playing at a park near an elementary school and were walking home when a car pulled up and someone asked if they were in a particular gang, family members and police said.

“One relative said they had said they were not in the gang; another said shots rang out before they could answer. The gunman hit four girls and a boy.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

The Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. voted against Arizona's appeal, which would have allowed a state ban on drivers licenses for young undocumented immigrants.

Supreme Court Refuses To Block Arizona Drivers Licenses For ‘Dreamers’

Arizona’s appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court failed to prevent the state from having to issue driving permits to undocumented immigrants brought into the country as children.


George Stinney Jr. appears in an undated police booking photo provided by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. A South Carolina judge vacated the conviction of the 14-year-old, who was executed in 1944, saying he didn't receive a fair trial.

S.C. Judge Says 1944 Execution Of 14-Year-Old Boy Was Wrong

In her ruling, Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen wrote that she found that “fundamental, Constitutional violations of due process exist in the 1944 prosecution of George Stinney, Jr.”


U.S. intelligence officials believe North Korea was centrally involved in the recent attack on Sony Pictures' computer network — possibly out of retribution for its film The Interview. Above, a security guard stands outside a theater during the film's premiere in Los Angeles last week.

U.S. Officials Believe North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack

The recent attack on Sony Pictures’ computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.


Bearing the message "The Greatest Gift is Knowledge," a holiday display by the Satanic Temple will accompany a Christian Nativity scene on the grounds of the Michigan State Capitol.

Satanist And Christian Holiday Displays To Go Up At Michigan Capitol

The situation has brought controversy — and energized Christians who realized that a planned Nativity scene was in danger of being canceled.


Obama Issues 12 Pardons, Commutes 8 Sentences

President Obama commuted the prison sentences of eight people who were convicted of drug-related crimes Wednesday, in a move that also saw 12 presidential pardons issued.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments