Nation & World News

Pakistani Court Tosses Out Attempted Murder Charge Against Baby

By Bill Chappell on April 12th, 2014

Weeks after he was fingerprinted and appeared in court on an attempted murder charge, baby Mohammad Musa Khan is no longer living under the shadow of a criminal conviction. His case has been termed absurd, ridiculous and a sign of a justice system in need of reform.

A Pakistani court ruled Saturday that charges against the boy, who was reportedly 9 months old when he was charged, will not be pursued. The case began when police faced resistance as officials tried to cut off gas service in the neighborhood. Police said the boy, along with other residents, threw rocks at them.

Musa and his family were charged with “planning a murder, threatening police and interfering in state affairs,” the BBC says.

The case sparked widespread disbelief and ridicule, after a video showed Musa in court holding his milk bottle as he sat on his grandfather’s lap. Other images showed him crying as his fingerprints were recorded on paper.

The police inspector in the case has been suspended, reports Agence France-Presse. The agency adds that the charges against Musa “were in direct contradiction with Pakistan’s minimum age of criminal responsibility, which was raised from seven to 12 years in 2013 except in terrorism cases.”

Several of Musa’s relatives remain in legal jeopardy over events that occurred in early February, when residents of their Lahore neighborhood allegedly attacked police.

From The Wall Street Journal:

“It started out as a raid by police on households who weren’t staying their gas bills, in the lower middle class Muslim Town district of Lahore on Feb. 1. The police went into the neighborhood to disconnect defaulters from the piped gas network. Nonpayment of gas and electricity bills is a major challenge for Pakistan, and one of the causes of the country’s energy crisis.”

Members of Musa’s family have said the push to cut off gas service was motivated by a land grab, accusing others of colluding with the police to pressure their area’s residents.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

U.S. goalie Hope Solo trains for Tuesday's semifinal game against Germany in the Women's World Cup.

U.S.-Germany Soccer Match Is Showdown Between World’s Top 2 Teams

The second-ranked U.S. plays No. 1 Germany in a semifinal tonight. They’re battling for a spot in Sunday’s final.


Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras prepares for a TV interview at the State Television in Athens on Monday. He urged Greeks to vote "no" in Sunday's referendum on the terms of a bailout.

Greece Hours Away From Defaulting On IMF Loan

Greece has until 5 p.m. ET to make a loan payment to the International Monetary Fund. The prime minister is urging Greeks to vote “no” in Sunday’s referendum on proposals from the country’s creditors.


Alejandro Garcia Padilla, the governor of Puerto Rico, discussing the commonwealth's budget earlier in 2015.

Puerto Rico’s Governor Wants Lenders To Wait For More Than $73 Billion Debt Payments

In a televised address, the governor said he’ll ask international creditors to give Puerto Rico easier terms, starting with a delay in payments. He also warned his people of coming budget cuts.


People who oppose vaccinating their children wouldn't be able to cite personal beliefs if the bill became law.

California Legislature Passes ‘Mandatory’ Vaccine Bill, Sends It To The Governor

Children who have specific medical problems, like immune system deficiencies, would be exempt from vaccinations as long as they have confirmation from their doctor.


The EU and national flags fly in the foreground of the Parthenon, as Greek voters prepare to decide whether to continue negotiating for more international loans.

If The Mess In Greece Is All Greek To You, Then Read This

This week, Greek will miss a $1.73 billion payment to the International Monetary Fund. The debt crisis has the potential to create financial, economic and geopolitical trouble for Americans.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments