Nation & World News

Rep. John Dingell, Who Has Served A Record 58 Years, Is Retiring

By Mark Memmott on February 24th, 2014

Michigan Democratic Rep. John Dingell, who was first elected to Congress in 1955 to fill a seat his father had held, says he will not seek re-election later this year.

He’ll leave office having served in Congress longer than anyone else in history. Last June, Dingell passed the previous record holder, the late Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Va.

Both The Detroit Free-Press and The Detroit News have the story.

Dingell, who turns 88 in July, tells the News that “I’m not going to be carried out feet first. … I don’t want people to say I stayed too long.”

As Ken Rudin noted in the Political Junkie blog:

“Dingell is best known for his tireless championing of the Detroit auto industry. For that he has been criticized by environmentalists, even though his career is filled with major conservation victories, such as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act. But his resistance to new fuel-economy standards in automobiles was partly behind his being dumped as chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee [in 2008]. …

“He has also played a major role in civil rights legislation, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and health care legislation, including the creation of Medicare in 1965.”

According to the News:

“More than health concerns, Dingell says a disillusionment with the institution drove his decision to retire.

” ‘I find serving in the House to be obnoxious,’ he says. ‘It’s become very hard because of the acrimony and bitterness, both in Congress and in the streets.’ ”

The Free Press points out that “with Dingell’s departure at the end of the current term in early January, the longest-serving active member of Congress will be another Michigander, U.S. Rep. John Conyers, D-Detroit, who once worked for Dingell and has been in the House since 1965.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

This 2013 photo shows the LD 350-1 mandible just steps from where it was found in Ethiopia. The jawbone fragment is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists say.

Jawbone Fossil Fills Big Gap In Human Evolution, Scientists Say

Writing in Science, scientists say the 2.8-million-year-old fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans.


The Ferguson, Mo., police department is criticized in a new Justice Department report. The department says there is no evidence to warrant civil rights charges over the death of Michael Brown last August.

Ferguson Report: Justice Dept. Says Wilson Won’t Face Civil Rights Charges

The report concludes “that Darren Wilson’s actions do not constitute prosecutable violations under the applicable federal criminal civil rights statute.”


Turkish Airlines’ Near-Miss Creates Big Problem At Kathmandu’s Tiny Airport

What do you do when a plane crash-lands at your country’s only international airport and you have no equipment to move it out of the way? Nepalese airport officials are grappling with that question.


Spain is exporting record amounts of wine. Earlier this year, Spain's King Felipe VI, center, and Queen Letizia toasted with Freixenet president Josep Lluis Bonet during a visit to the winemaker's headquarters in Sant Sadurni d'Anoia, Spain.

Spain’s Wine Exports Soar 22 Percent — But Profits Fall

Spain’s wine industry had a record year in 2014, posting numbers that could propel it past Italy as the world’s biggest wine exporter. But most of the wine was sold cheaply, in bulk.


Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) attends an Interior Ministry meeting Wednesday in Moscow. He condemned the death of Boris Nemtsov, saying it was a "disgrace" to Russia.

Putin Speaks About The Killing Of Kremlin Critic Boris Nemtsov

Russia’s president said Nemtsov’s death was a shameful tragedy. Nemtsov was gunned down near the Kremlin on Friday. His supporters blame Russian authorities.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments