Nation & World News

Despite Soundproof Box, Egypt’s Morsi Is Defiant In Court

By Krishnadev Calamur on January 28th, 2014

“I am the legitimate president of the country, and this trial is not legal.”

Ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi struck a defiant tone with those words at his trial Tuesday in a Cairo courtroom.

As NPR’s Leila Fadel tells our Newscast unit, Morsi is standing trial in three different cases. Leila reports:

“Today, he and over 100 others are charged with aiding and participating in a prison break during the 2011 uprising. His other charges in separate cases include espionage and inciting violence. Critics and human rights groups have called the charges politicized and in some cases fantastical.”

Tuesday is the third anniversary of the jailbreak case during which several police officers were killed.

Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president, and his fellow defendants were kept in a soundproof glass box – which some news reports called a glass cage — during the trial. The New York Times reported:

“The soundproof cage, previously unheard-of in Egyptian courts, demonstrated the extraordinary measures that the new government is using to silence Mr. Morsi, who stole the spotlight by disrupting the first session of his trial in November. Appearing then in a dark business suit instead of the usual white prison jumpsuit, he seized the moment to insist noisily that he was the fairly elected president and the victim of an illegal coup.”

It was Morsi’s second appearance in court since he was ousted in a military-backed coup in July amid nationwide protests against the Islamist leader who draws much of his support from the Muslim Brotherhood.

Egypt’s official Al Ahram newspaper has more on the proceedings:

“TV footage showed Morsi in white prison garb, nervously pacing back and forth in a cage in the courthouse, alongside other Islamist defendants who shouted ‘null, null’ at the judges, whose legitimacy they refuse to acknowledge. Morsi also shouted at the judge, telling him: “Who are you?” The judge simply said “I’m the head of the Criminal Court” in response.”

The trial was adjourned until Feb. 22.

Morsi was brought to court by helicopter from a prison in Alexandria, Al Ahram reported.

Morsi’s court appearance comes a day after Egypt’s military announced that Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi should run for president. If he contests the April elections, Sissi is widely expected to win.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Vincenzo Nibali First Italian In 15 Years To Win Tour De France

The cyclist had dominated the Tour, wearing the yellow jersey through all but two stages of the grueling three-week competition.


Image released by the U.S. State Department showing what it says is evidence of Russia firing artillery into eastern Ukraine.

U.S.: Satellite Images Show Russian Rockets Hitting Ukraine

The State Department says the photos show burn marks from the firing of multiple rocket launchers inside Russia and resulting craters on the other side of the border.


Hank Johnson displays his Glock handgun, inside his home in Springboro, Ohio. D.C. lawmakers had hoped to maintain a ban on carrying handguns in public, but a district court last week overturned it.

Judges Overturns D.C. Ban On Handguns In Public

A district court judge says the law that prohibited people from carrying handguns outside their homes violates the Second Amendment.


Birth Of 100-Millionth Person In Philippines Greeted With Joy, Concern

Chonalyn, a 6-pound girl, was born Sunday morning in a Manila hospital. But the head of the country’s population commission says it will be a challenge to provide for so many people.


The entrance of the compounds of the U.S. embassy is pictured in Tripoli on Saturday. Fighting continues to rage after the U.S. evacuated the diplomatic facility.

Libyan Conflict Rages After U.S. Shuts Embassy

Fighting in the country’s east has killed at least 38 people since the U.S. on Saturday temporarily closed its embassy in the capital, citing security concerns.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments