Nation & World News

Looking To Escape The Deep Freeze? Head To Alaska

By Mark Memmott on January 27th, 2014

The National Weather Service is warning, once again, that brutally cold weather is going to be spreading across much of the nation, from the upper Midwest down to the deep South and up through the mid-Atlantic, Northeast and New England.

The Weather Service even throws an exclamation point into its forecast for this week:

“The airmass and the associated surface high pressure with it is literally coming from the North Pole and heading nearly due south into the central U.S. by Tuesday!”

Among the places where things are particularly miserable if you don’t like extremely cold temperatures: Minnesota.

Minnesota Public Radio’s Tim Nelson tells our Newscast Desk that it feels like it’s 20-degrees below zero (or colder) in many parts of the state as winds blow through. What’s worse, he says, is that “a Canadian natural gas pipeline explosion has crippled natural gas supplies to part of the region. Emergency officials are asking residents in the Red River Valley and the Brainerd area to keep their thermostats at 60 to conserve fuel.” For many other homeowners, there’s this problem: Propane prices are up sharply in the state.

Meanwhile, “for California and the Inter-Mountain West, a much quieter weather pattern will prevail for the next few days as high pressure stays in charge. This is providing pleasant temperatures for this time of year.”

We also want to take note of what’s happening in Alaska. As AccuWeather.com reports, “on multiple dates this month, temperatures have been warmer in Alaska than they have been in Texas, Louisiana and much of the Atlantic coast, including Florida. Nome, Alaska, which lies at 64.5 degrees north latitude has experienced at least seven days so far this month where temperatures have climbed above freezing. The normal high for Nome is 13 F.”

Forecasters think this pattern — a jet stream that’s pushing brutal cold across much of the continental U.S. while there’s relatively warm weather up in parts of Alaska — won’t shift until sometime next month.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Video shows a woman trying to outrun a train.

WATCH: Video Shows Women Narrowly Escape Death On Railroad Tracks

The 4,000-ton freight train could not come to a stop. But the women laid down between the rails and survived.


Video shows a woman trying to outrun a train.

WATCH: Video Shows Women Narrowly Escape Death On Railroad Tracks

The 4,000-ton freight train could not come to a stop. But the women laid down between the rails and survived.


Video shows a woman trying to outrun a train.

WATCH: Video Shows Women Narrowly Escape Death On Railroad Tracks

The 4,000-ton freight train could not come to a stop. But the women laid down between the rails and survived.


A Palestinian girl cries while receiving treatment for her injuries caused by an Israeli strike at a U.N. school in Jebaliya refugee camp, at the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya on Wednesday.

Gaza Conflict: Shell Strikes U.N. School, Killing Up To 19 Who Sought Shelter

One U.N. official said this was a “breaking point.” The conflict, now going into its 23rd day, shows no sign of abating. The death toll in Gaza has now surpassed 1,200.


Water cascades down a stairway to a parking structure adjacent to Pauley Pavlion, home of UCLA basketball.

Water Main Break Dumps Up To 10 Million Gallons Of Water, Flooding UCLA

It took officials about four hours to figure out which valve needed to be closed. By then, the UCLA campus was under water, with some staircases looking like waterfalls.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments