Nation & World News

As Protests Spread In Ukraine, ‘State Of Emergency’ Possible

By Mark Memmott on January 27th, 2014

The latest news from the Ukrainian capital, Kiev, includes:

– Word that anti-government demonstrations have spread to cities where the citizens normally show support for President Viktor Yanukovych. (Morning Edition)

– A warning from Ukraine’s justice minister to “anti-government protesters occupying her ministry [that] she will call for a state of emergency if they do not leave.” (BBC News)

– The likelihood that “imposing a state of emergency would … further anger protesters, who on Sunday mourned Mikhailo Zhyznevsky, one of at least three victims of clashes between police and protesters last week. Thousands marched behind the coffin carrying the body of Zhyznevsky, a Belarusian who lived in Ukraine. He died of gunshot wounds.” (The Guardian)

As for what would happen if a state of emergency is declared, BBC correspondent David Stern says “the question at the heart of the debate is whether the government can count on the loyalty of enough troops to first clear the streets of Ukraine’s cities, and then deal with the inevitable violent backlash.”

On Morning Edition, NPR’s Corey Flintoff reported from Kiev that the protests against the Yanukovych government appear to have solid support from the middle class.

On Sunday, Corey said, tens of thousand of people gathered in the capital’s central square — “most of them standing quietly.” There were many middle-aged and middle-class people in the crowd.

Over the weekend, as we reported, Yanukovych offered the posts of prime minister and deputy prime minister to two of the protest leaders. His offer was rejected, however.

“The opposition says it [was] a trick,” Corey reported — an offer that would “put them in a much worse position if they accepted it” because the president and his supporters still control the parliament and would make the prime minister and deputy posts largely irrelevant.

What the protesters want, as Corey reminded us, is an end to government corruption, freedom for political prisoners and for Ukraine to be aligned with the European Union, not Russia. That means Yanukovych needs to go, they insist.

The protests began last November when Yanukovych backed away from a pending deal with the EU. They have accelerated in the past week to 10 days.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, left, with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen.  Martin Dempsey during a Pentagon briefing on Thursday. Hagel said Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria posed a threat "beyond anything we've seen."

ISIS ‘Beyond Anything We’ve Seen,’ Hagel Says

The secretary of defense says the extremists are well funded and organized and that he expects them to “regroup and stage an offensive” despite U.S. airstrikes.


U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel Shapiro accepted the ALS "Ice Bucket Challenge." Soon after, the State Department warned that participation by high-profile diplomats was a violation of internal policy.

U.S. Diplomatic Cable Puts Chill On ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

The State Department lauded the fundraising phenomenon, but said the participation of high-profile diplomats, such as ambassadors, violates internal policy.


Thailand's newly appointed Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha gestures in a traditional greeting during his to a unit of the Queen's Guard outside of Bangkok on Thursday.

Thailand’s Parliament Hands Prime Minister Post To Coup Leader

Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, who led a May putsch against the country’s democratically elected government, was approved unanimously by a hand-picked legislature.


U.S. Won’t Rule Out Attack In Syria To Hit Islamic State

American aircraft have carried out more strikes against the Islamic State, after the extremist group beheaded U.S. journalist James Foley. The attacks come despite threats to kill other hostages.


New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg stands at his desk at the paper's office in Kabul on Wednesday. Afghanistan gave Rosenberg 24 hours to leave the country.

Afghanistan Expels ‘Times’ Reporter Over Article About Potential Coup

New York Times correspondent Matthew Rosenberg was forced to leave Afghanistan after officials called one of his recent stories a threat to national security.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments