Nation & World News

Something Cool: Photos Of Huge Snow Sculptures In China

By Eyder Peralta on December 23rd, 2013

The 26th Harbin International Snow Sculpture Art Expo is in full swing in China. Known as the largest festival of its kind the world, it’s always pretty spectacular.

We thought we’d round up some pictures to give you a sense of the wonder:

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