Nation & World News

U.S. And Japanese Officials Discuss China’s Air Defense Claim

By Bill Chappell on November 28th, 2013

Concerned by China’s move to assert itself in an area claimed by Japan, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel spoke with his Japanese counterpart Wednesday. China’s military says it monitored a flight Tuesday by U.S. bombers through an air defense zone recently outlined by China.

While saying that the Chinese action ” raises the risk of misunderstanding and miscalculation,” Hagel also told Japan’s Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera that “U.S. military operations will not in any way change,” according to a Department of Defense release about the phone call.

For our Newscast unit, NPR’s Larry Abramson filed this report:

“Hagel told Minister Onodera that China’s declaration of an Air Identification Zone over the East China Sea is a potentially destabilizing action. China declared that zone over the weekend, as part of its effort to claim jurisdiction over islands known as the Senkaku in Japan, which has administered the islands for decades.

“Hagel also reaffirmed U.S. policy, which says a mutual defense agreement between the two countries includes these islands. On Monday, the U.S. sent two unarmed B-52 bombers over the zone and said the U.S. military would refuse to comply with air identification requirements set by the Chinese.”

As NPR’s Parallels blog notes, “Japan’s major airlines, including Japan Airlines and ANA, initially said they would inform China of their flight plans. But upon the Japanese government’s intervention, the airlines reversed course.”

Wednesday, Chinese defense officials said its military had monitored the U.S. bombers’ flight through the area.

“We need to stress that China will identify every aircraft flying in the air defense identification zone according to the country’s announcement of aircraft identification rules for the air defense identification zone,” China’s defense ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng said, according to the Xinhua news agency.

“China is capable of exercising effective control over this airspace,” Geng added.

And China will establish other air defense zones “in due time,” according to a separate Xinhua report that cites a foreign ministry official.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

In an image provided by NASA, astronaut Randy Bresnik prepares to enter Boeing's CST-100 spacecraft for an evaluation at the company's Houston Product Support Center. NASA awarded Boeing with a $4.2 billion contract Tuesday.

Boeing And SpaceX Win $6.8 Billion In NASA Contracts

By 2017, the two American companies are expected to take over a job that NASA has relied upon Russia to perform: shuttling astronauts to the International Space Station.


President Obama spoke Tuesday about the U.S. plan to fight the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, speaking at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The White House plan reportedly includes deploying 3,000 U.S. military personnel and training health care providers in Liberia.

Obama Gives New Details On America’s Effort To Fight Ebola

The president announced a “major increase” in the U.S. response to the outbreak, including a new military command center in Liberia, and sending medical professionals from the U.S. to field hospitals.


Inmate Frank Van Den Bleeken, seen here in court last autumn, says he wants to die because he sees no progress in the mental problems that were linked to his crimes of murder and rape.

Belgium Agrees To Euthanize Man Convicted Of Murder, Rape

Frank Van Den Bleeken says he wants to die because he hasn’t seen any change in himself. A court agreed — and now his case is raising prickly questions in a country that has no death penalty.


U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier ruled nearly two weeks ago that BP acted recklessly in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig accident and oil spill.

BP Lawyers Use Old-School Trick; Judge Not Amused

A legal filing tied to the company’s Gulf oil spill case was supposed to have been capped at 35 pages. But lawyers for BP got a little creative with the spacing.


Not everyone's a dog lover. A new magazine in Germany caters to the haters.

In Germany, A Magazine For The Dog-Tired

Germans have long had plenty of choices when it comes to magazines catering to canine lovers. But one publisher thinks the time has finally come to throw the dog haters a bone.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments