Nation & World News

City Of Vancouver Shows Doorknobs The Exit

By Scott Neuman on November 20th, 2013

The doorknob is dead. At least in Vancouver.

A recent revision in the British Columbian city’s building code, designed to improve accessibility, shows the door to the venerable knob, replacing it with the hipper and easier-to-use lever.

The Vancouver Sun reports:

“In September, Vancouver council adopted new amendments to its building code, effective next March, that, among other things, will require lever handles on all doors and lever faucets in all new housing construction.”

The change has been coming for some time. Last year, for example, all the Art Deco doorknobs in Vancouver’s heritage-listed City Hall were swapped out for “utilitarian gold-coloured levers,” the Sun says.

The newspaper says Vancouver is a national trendsetter, so there appears to be no way out of the doorknob’s impending demise across Canada.

Some accuse Vancouver city officials of flying off the handle with the new code. Allen Joslyn, president of the (New Jersey-based) Antique Door Knob Collectors of America says understands that in a public building “everybody wants to have free access and that is a problem.”

“But to say that when I build my private home and nobody is disabled that I have to put levers on, strikes me as overreach,” Joslyn says.

Consumerist writes: “There won’t be a doorknob police squad busting into homes however, just all new housing construction will have to comply with the updated code and use lever handles and faucets.”

“So if you’ve got a knob, you can keep it. Cherish it, call it your precious, whatever you want,” the website says.

Even so, The Sun says:

“It is not like the doorknob will disappear entirely. Like many inventions, it will hold its own for a long, long time. There are, after all, a few people who still use typewriters instead of computers. Vancouver’s rule is not retroactive to existing homes. But over time, the effect will become magnified as housing is replaced.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

‘Post And Courier’ Of Charleston, S.C., Wins Pulitzer For Public Service

The newspaper’s series examined why South Carolina is among the deadliest states for women in the United States. Anthony Doerr won the prize for fiction for All the Light We Cannot See.


A shipwreck is seen near the coast in Lake Michigan, where clear waters recently allowed a Coast Guard helicopter to take striking aerial photos of several wreck sites.

Shipwrecks Ahoy: Coast Guard Shares Pics From Crystal-Clear Lake Michigan

All of that cold, fresh water has helped preserve wrecked ships over the years. A Coast Guard helicopter recently captured some striking images of historic ships.


Iran Charges ‘Washington Post’ Reporter With Espionage

Jason Rezaian’s lawyer says he has been charged with four serious crimes. The Washington Post‘s Tehran bureau chief has been detained for nine months and held in the notorious Evin prison.


FBI Director James Comey's comments about Poland's role in the Holocaust have angered officials in that country.

FBI Chief’s Comments Linking Poland To Holocaust Draw Angry Response

In a speech last week, James Comey appeared to suggest that Poles had been complicit in the Holocaust. Polish leaders, who have long recoiled at that assertion, demanded an apology.


Tim Tebow Will Reportedly Return To NFL With Philadelphia Eagles

It would be the former Heisman winner’s fourth NFL team. The New York Jets released Tebow in the spring of 2013; later that same year, he was cut by the New England Patriots.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments