Nation & World News

Suicide Bombing Causes Multiple Deaths In Afghanistan

By Mark Memmott on November 17th, 2013

A suicide bombing Saturday in Kabul, Afghanistan, near the site where elders will meet next week to debate a security pact with the U.S. caused multiple deaths and injuries, NPR’s Sean Carberry tells our Newscast Desk.

He reports that:

“The huge blast destroyed cars and shops and scattered debris for more than 100 yards. Witnesses describe seeing injured and dead civilians being pulled from the scene. Afghan officials claim the bomber was under surveillance and exploded his vehicle when stopped at the checkpoint.”

According to the BBC, at least 10 people were killed and more than 20 others were injured.

The security pact, as All Things Considered has reported, would “keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the NATO mission ends next year.” But a key issue to be debated by the Afghan elders is whether U.S. troops will be subject to Afghan or U.S. law. If they insist on Afghan law, that could lead to the agreement’s collapse.

Afghan officials, Sean adds, doubt the site of the elders’ upcoming debate was the target of Saturday’s bombing. As of mid-morning in the U.S., no group had claimed responsibility. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has said the Taliban is welcome to send a representative to the elders’ loya jirga.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

This mako shark looks like its ancient ancestors, but it's probably evolved to be even more terrifying.

New Fossil Takes A Bite Out Of Theory That Sharks Barely Evolved

A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.


SAT preparation books on a bookstore shelf in New York City. The College Board has announced changes in the college entrance exam.

The New SAT: Less Vocabulary, More Linear Equations

The new version of the standardized test for college admissions, set to go into effect in 2016, will do away with obscure vocabulary words and cut multiple choice answer options from five to four.


Former Bell city manager Robert Rizzo arrives at the Edward R. Roybal Federal building and United States courthouse on Monday. Rizzo received 12 years in prison and was ordered to pay nearly $9 million in restitution for a scheme to pad his salary.

Ex-City Manager Caught In Calif. Salary Scandal Gets 12 Years

Robert Rizzo, who paid himself an $800,000 salary for running the small town of Bell, Calif., took advantage of the fact that there were “no checks and balances” in city government, the judge said.


Hurricane Katrina holdout Hazzert Gillett reads his Bible in his New Orleans home in September 2005. The state's Legislature is considering a bill to make the Holy Bible the official state book.

Holy Bible Could Become Louisiana’s Official Book

Lawmakers have proposed a bill that would make the Bible the state’s official book, but critics say it is unconstitutional and would open Louisiana up to legal challenges.


Judge Overturns North Dakota’s Strict Abortion Law

U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland called the state’s ban on abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy “invalid and unconstitutional.”


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments