Nation & World News

Larry Flynt Seeks To Block Execution Of Man Who Shot Him

By Alan Greenblatt on November 13th, 2013

Larry Flynt doesn’t want the man who shot him to die.

The pornography publisher was shot and paralyzed in 1978 by Joseph Paul Franklin, a white supremacist who objected to a photo spread of an African American man and a white woman published in Hustler magazine.

Franklin is scheduled to be executed on Nov. 20 for a 1977 murder committed outside a synagogue in a St. Louis suburb.

“A life spent in a 3-by-6-foot cell is far harsher than the quick release of a lethal injection,” Flynt wrote last month in The Hollywood Reporter. “I have had many years in this wheelchair to think about this very topic.”

On Saturday, the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri filed a motion on Flynt’s behalf to unseal documents regarding the case. The ACLU has been seeking to learn the identity of the anesthesiologist who will perform the lethal injection on Franklin.

“Flynt has learned about the secrecy shrouding Missouri’s execution process,” the filing states. “This includes recent revelations that Missouri appears to have used unsavory methods to secure and maintain execution drugs and tried to hide that and other information from the public.”

Missouri is among several states that have struggled recently with questions regarding the use of pharmaceuticals in executions.

Although the ACLU argues that Flynt has an interest in the case, Franklin is being executed for other crimes. “Franklin has confessed to eight murders and the nonfatal shootings of Flynt and civil rights leader Vernon Jordan, and is suspected in eight other killings,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.

Jordan, a good friend of former President Bill Clinton, has not commented publicly on Franklin’s execution.

In 1976 — four years prior to being shot in the back by Franklin — Jordan wrote an editorial calling for the Supreme Court to abolish the death penalty, which he called a “barbarous practice.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

A 2009 photo of Boston Mayor Tom Menino, who served for 20 years before stepping down this year. He died on Thursday.

Thomas Menino, Boston’s Longest-Serving Mayor, Dies At 71

Described as a hard-nosed, old-school pragmatist, he was diagnosed with cancer shortly after leaving office in January.


The new crash test dummy — not this one — will weigh 271 lbs and have a body mass index of 35. Automakers use the dummies to prove their vehicles are roadworthy.

New Crash Test Dummy To Gain Pounds To Reflect Fatalities Among Obese

Obese occupants of a vehicle are up to 78 percent more likely to die in a car crash than someone of average weight, says the CEO of Humanetics, the world’s largest maker of crash test dummies.


GDP Posts Strong 3.5 Percent Growth Rate In 3rd Quarter

The economy performed better-than-expected in the July-September period, after making a 4.6 percent jump in the second quarter of the year.


The Dome of the Rock Mosque in the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, known by the Jews as the Temple Mount, is seen in Jerusalem's Old City. Israel closed the site to all visitors on Thursday following an assassination attempt on an right-wing Jewish activist.

Palestinians Condemn Closure Of Disputed Religious Site In Jerusalem

Israel closed the Temple Mount, holy to both Muslims and Jews, following an assassination attempt against a right-wing Jewish activist who wants Jews to be able to pray at the site.


Poet Carolyn Forche stands with her friend and mentor Galway Kinnell (right) during a trip to Japan to attend the Asian Writers Congress in 1983.

Book News: Remembering Poet Galway Kinnell, Whose Song Said Everything

The Pulitzer Prize winner has died at the age of 87. In his deceptively simple poetry and in his activism, Kinnell sought to broaden his audience, even while grappling with difficult themes.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments