Nation & World News

Obama Apologizes To Those Who Lost Health Plans

By Bill Chappell on November 8th, 2013

“I am sorry that they are finding themselves in this situation based on assurances they got from me,” President Obama said Thursday, speaking about Americans who will lose their current health insurance plans.

In speeches before parts of the Affordable Care Act took effect, the president promised that people who were content with the plans they already had would be able to keep them. But that hasn’t always been the case, as The Two-Way reported in October.

Obama spoke about the troubled rollout of the new health care system with NBC’s Chuck Todd Thursday. Todd asked the president about the pledge he often repeated when critics of the Affordable Care Act said it would mean thousands of cancelled policies.

“I meant what I said,” Obama answered. “And we worked hard to try to make sure that we implemented it properly. But obviously, we didn’t do a good enough job. And I regret that.”

In addition to his apology, the president pledged to help those who have complained that the new law is forcing them to sign up for a more expensive plan.

“We’ve got to work hard to make sure that they know we hear them,” Obama said, “and that we’re going to do everything we can to deal with folks who find themselves in a tough position as a consequence of this.”

The appearance on NBC marks “a more apologetic tone” for the president on this issue, NPR’s Ari Shapiro reports.

“Until now, the White House had taken a defensive response to people being forced to change health plans. The president insisted that people losing their plans would get better and, in some cases, cheaper ones,” Ari says in a report for our Newscast unit.

“The White House is also still struggling to get the HealthCare.gov website up and running,” Ari adds. “It’s functioning better than before, but it’s still not up to speed.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

U.K. Officials Instructed To Grant Ai Weiwei’s Original U.K. Visa Request

The Home Office has apologized for denying the prominent Chinese dissident a six-month visa. He got only 20 days, because staff counted secret imprisonment as a criminal conviction.


Judge Says Virginia Can Refuse To Issue Confederate License Plates

Citing a June U.S. Supreme Court ruling, the federal judge effectively vacated a 14-year-old state injunction that prohibited officials from refusing to issue such plates.


Alan Cheuse, Novelist And Longtime NPR Contributor, Dies At 75

The author and critic died Friday of injuries sustained in a car accident. For years, he was the voice of NPR’s literature commentary — and, for many, the “guide to a very exciting world.”


Federal Court Places A Stay On Order Compelling NCAA To Pay Athletes

The ruling comes nearly a year after a district court judge ruled that the NCAA violated antitrust laws and should let schools pay athletes $5,000.


Dylann Roof, 21, charged with murdering nine worshippers at a historic black church in Charleston, S.C., in June, listens during court proceedings earlier this month.

Dylann Roof Pleads Not Guilty To Federal Hate Crime Charges

The 21-year-old is accused of carrying out the ruthless attack that killed nine worshippers in a historic black church in Charleston, S.C., last month.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments