Nation & World News

Al-Qaida Group Says It Killed French Journalists In Mali

By Scott Neuman on November 7th, 2013

Al-Qaida’s North African affiliate said Wednesday it is responsible for the kidnapping and killing of two French journalists in Mali over the weekend.

A website used by al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) said that Radio France Internationale’s senior correspondent Ghislaine Dupont and a production technician for the network, Claude Verlon, were killed in response to France’s “new crusade.”

Sahara Media, a website used by the jihadists, said the killings were an answer to the “‘daily crimes’ committed by French and Malian forces in northern Mali,” where France launched a military operation in January to flush out the Islamic extremists, The Associated Press says.

“The organization considers that this is the least of the price which (French) President Francois Hollande and his people will pay for their new crusade,” the statement reads.

However, AP reports:

“A Mali intelligence official involved in the case said investigators believe the kidnapping was the work of a lower-level jihadist trying to return to the good graces of the al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb after being accused of stealing money. The militant is believed to have been reporting to Abdelkarim al-Targui, a prominent Malian in the al-Qaida branch, the official said.”

France said the killings were a “calculated assassination.”

The BBC, which says the bodies of the two were already being repatriated to France, says “they were kidnapped and shot dead on Saturday after interviewing a local leader in the northern town of Kidal.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

India Bans Film About Infamous 2012 Gang Rape

The government also says it will investigate how the makers of India’s Daughter got permission to interview one of the men convicted of the brutal rape and killing of a 23-year-old woman in New Delhi.


This 2013 photo shows the LD 350-1 mandible just steps from where it was found in Ethiopia. The jawbone fragment is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists say.

Jawbone Fossil Fills Big Gap In Human Evolution, Scientists Say

Writing in Science, scientists say the 2.8 million-year-old fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans.


The Ferguson, Mo., police department is criticized in a new Justice Department report. The department says there is no evidence to warrant civil rights charges over the death of Michael Brown last August.

Ferguson Report: Former Officer Won’t Face Civil Rights Charges

While Darren Wilson will avoid federal charges for the death of Michael Brown, the Justice Department did find racial bias in the Ferguson, Mo., police and justice system.


Turkish Airlines’ Near-Miss Creates Big Problem At Kathmandu’s Tiny Airport

What do you do when a plane crash-lands at your country’s only international airport and you have no equipment to move it out of the way? Nepalese airport officials are grappling with that question.


Spain is exporting record amounts of wine. Earlier this year, Spain's King Felipe VI, center, and Queen Letizia toasted with Freixenet president Josep Lluis Bonet during a visit to the winemaker's headquarters in Sant Sadurni d'Anoia, Spain.

Spain’s Wine Exports Soar 22 Percent — But Profits Fall

Spain’s wine industry had a record year in 2014, posting numbers that could propel it past Italy as the world’s biggest wine exporter. But most of the wine was sold cheaply, in bulk.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments