Nation & World News

Did Bullying Claim After 91-0 Game Do More Harm Than Good?

By Mark Memmott on October 24th, 2013

Sports talk shows and news outlets have been all over the story of a Texas parent who filed a complaint about bullying after his son’s high school football team lost a game last week by the score of 91-0.

If you haven’t heard about what happened during that game, here’s how Fort Worth’s Star-Telegram sums up the story:

“Aledo [High School] beat Fort Worth Western Hills 91-0 at home, pushing its season scoring pace to 69.3 points a game and running its undefeated record to 7-0. In four District 7-4A games against Fort Worth schools, the Bearcats have outscored their opponents by an average of 77 points per game.”

CBS Local in Dallas/Fort Worth says Aledo kept scoring even though its coach, after seeing his team score 56 points by halftime, “began actively trying to keep the score down, subbing in backup players, letting the clock run continuously, and instructing players to make fair catch calls.”

Western Hills coach John Naylor had no problem with the way Aledo played. “We just ran into a buzzsaw,” he told the Star-Telegram. “[Aledo] just plays hard. And they’re good sports, and they don’t talk at all. They get after it, and that’s the way football is supposed to be played in Texas.”

But an unidentified parent did have an issue with what happened, and filed a complaint with the Aledo school that the CBS Local station says alleges “we all witnessed bullying firsthand, it is not a pretty sight.”

Wednesday, Aledo coach Tim Buchanan said his district has investigated and found “no grounds” for the bullying charge.

The game and the bullying allegation, as we said, have caused much discussion. Even widely quoted legal scholar Jonathan Turley has weighed in, writing that “it is not unsportsmanlike or bullying to play a game to a lopsided conclusion. It is called life. This is just one of its lessons.”

One line of thought from many critics of the parent’s complaint is that bullying can be deadly — leading in some cases to young victims taking their lives. An accusation about a lopsided football game could make it look like bullying isn’t a serious problem, they say. It also could be disrespectful to bullying’s victims.

We wonder what everyone thinks.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

A customer picks up his just-bought iPhone.

WATCH: First Guy In Perth To Get Hands On New iPhone Drops It On Live TV

Jack Cooksey, 18, was unpacking his brand-new iPhone 6 for a local TV reporter, when he accidentally dropped it. The rest of the customers still in line groaned.


NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell held a news conference on Friday, during which he said, "I got it wrong on the handling of Ray Rice. ... But now I will get it right."

NFL Commissioner: ‘We Will Get Our House In Order’

Roger Goodell has been embroiled in controversy over how the league has handled off-field violent behavior of some of its star players. He said he had not considered resigning.


White House Announces Campaign Against Campus Sexual Assault

In unveiling the “It’s On Us” campaign aimed at preventing attacks on college campuses, President Obama said such violence is “an affront to our basic humanity.”


Alibaba founder and CEO Jack Ma has much to laugh about. Shares in the company opened at $92.70 in the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. The company is now valued at more than $200 billion — that's bigger that Amazon and Facebook.

Alibaba Shares Surge On First Day Of Trading

Shares of the Chinese e-commerce giant opened at $92.70 a share on the New York Stock Exchange today, making it the biggest initial public offering in U.S. history. They were priced at $68 a share.


Elizabeth Lessner stands behind the bar at Betty's Food and Spirits in Columbus, Ohio, in 2004.

Iconic Pabst Beer Brands Sold To Russian Company

Pabst Brewing Co., with its famous Blue Ribbon, Old Milwaukee and Schlitz labels, is being acquired by Russian brewer Oasis Beverages for an undisclosed sum.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments