Nation & World News

Pew: Most Latinos Can’t Name ‘Most Important Hispanic Leader’

By Eyder Peralta on October 23rd, 2013

While most Latinos believe it’s important for their community to have a national leader, most of them can’t pinpoint whom they think that leader is.

That’s the new finding from a survey released today by the Pew Research Hispanic Trends Project. Survey participants were asked an open-ended question to name the person they think is “the most important Hispanic leader in the country today.”

Sixty-two percent responded they didn’t know and 9 percent said no one.

Only four leaders were named by more than 2 percent of the respondents:

— Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor — the high court’s first Hispanic justice — was mentioned by 5 percent.

— Sen. Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, was named by 5 percent.

— Former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was named by 3 percent.

— And Rep. Luis Gutierrez, an Illinois Democrat, was named by 2 percent.

Pew explains:

“The survey was conducted at a time when Latino political leaders and civic organizations have been pressing hard for legislation in Congress to create a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 11.7 million immigrants, the vast majority of them Latino, who are living in this country illegally.

“Even though most Latinos say their community needs a national leader to advance its concerns, the survey finds that not all Latinos agree that their community has shared values.

“Overall, four-in-ten (39%) respondents say that U.S. Latinos of different origins share ‘a lot’ of values, while another 39% say U.S. Latinos share ‘some’ values and an additional 19% say that they share few or no values. By similar shares, Latinos living in this country are divided about how many values they share with Latinos living in their families’ country of origin.”

Of course, these findings aren’t totally surprising. Earlier this year, when the pace on immigration reform quickened, we explored the issue. We asked people who were among the thousands protesting in Washington, D.C., who was the leader of the movement. No one could come up with a name.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

A man looks at ancient Assyrian human-headed winged bull statues at the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad on Saturday.

Iraq’s National Museum To Open For First Time Since 2003 Invasion

The planned reopening was moved up following the release of a video showing self-declared Islamic State extremists destroying priceless ancient artifacts in the Mosul museum.


Members of Palestinian security forces loyal to Hamas patrol on the border between Egypt and southern Gaza Strip earlier this month.

Egypt Declares Hamas ‘Terrorist’ Group

The organization, an offshoot of Egypt’s banned Muslim Brotherhood, controls the Gaza Strip.


People lay flowers on Saturday at the place where Boris Nemtsov, a charismatic Russian opposition leader and sharp critic of President Vladimir Putin, was gunned down, at Red Square in Moscow, Russia.

West Calls On Russia For Independent Probe Of Nemtsov’s Murder

The opposition leader and harsh critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, was gunned down in public on Friday.


Speaker of the House John Boehner responds to reporters about the impasse over passing the Homeland Security budget on Friday.

Funding Homeland Security: Where Do We Go From Here?

President Obama late Friday signed a stopgap measure to keep the department running for another week, but the tussle over his executive action on immigration, linked to the funding, is not over yet.


Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov was shot dead in Moscow today.

Putin Critic Boris Nemtsov Shot Dead

Nemtsov served as a governor and deputy prime minister in the 1990s. He later became an opposition leader and sharp critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. He was killed on a street in Moscow.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments