Nation & World News

Girl’s Deportation Was Mishandled, But Legal, French Say

By Mark Memmott on October 19th, 2013

“An interior ministry investigation into the controversial deportation of a Roma schoolgirl from France has found that her deportation was lawful, but said police could have used better judgment in the case,” France 24 is reporting.

As Eleanor Beardsley reported for All Things Considered on Friday, 15-year-old Leonarda Dibrani “is at the center of an emotional debate in France over the country’s immigration policies. … [She] was taken away by police during a field trip with her school class last week and deported along with her parents and five siblings to Kosovo. Many French are outraged at the way she was seized. And whether the deportation was legal or not, many say the action runs contrary to French human rights values.”

France 24 writes today that “French law bans the police from approaching students while they are at or near school. The report stated that while the bus was nowhere near Dibrani’s school, authorities showed a lack of judgement and recommended that the law be changed to prohibit any future incidents during school hours.”

France’s RFI radio network adds that Leonarda “says she will not take up President François Hollande’s offer to return to France without her family … declaring that she would not ‘abandon’ her family.”

Eleanor noted that “the case has echoes of the debate in the U.S. over immigration and the status of those who came to the country illegally as children and have little or no connection to the land of their birth. French media are reporting that the Dibrani family came illegally to France from Kosovo about five years ago because they are Roma, sometimes referred to as Gypsies, and faced discrimination and few opportunities there.”

RFI reports, though, that Leonarda’s father “told the AFP news agency that only he had been born in Kosovo and that his wife and five of his six children, including Leonarda, were born in Italy.”

National Geographic has an online “history of the Romani people,” who are “more commonly known to outsiders as Gypsies.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Fast-Track Trade Authority, A Step Toward Asia Deal, Passes Full Senate

The bill still must clear the House. The measure would clear the way for President Obama’s Trans-Pacific Partnership, which is unpopular with labor groups and some Democrats.


TLC Pulls ’19 Kids And Counting’ Amid Reports Of Star’s Sexual Misconduct As Minor

Reports say Josh Duggar, 27, molested five underage girls in 2002 and 2003. Duggar has apologized, and his family says they have been open about “one of the most difficult times of our lives.”


Man Convicted Of Killing D.C. Intern Chandra Levy To Get New Trial

Prosecutors have agreed not to oppose a new trial for Ingmar Guandique, who was found guilty in 2010 of killing Levy in 2001.


Decision On Gay Scout Leaders To Come By October, Group’s Head Says

Robert Gates, the former CIA director and former defense secretary, tells NPR that the Boy Scouts of America needs to talk to sponsoring institutions about the potential change.


Policemen face protesters during a protest in central Bangkok today. Thai authorities detained dozens of activists protesting against military rule on the one-year anniversary of a coup against the elected government.

Thai Authorities Arrest Protesters On Anniversary Of 2014 Coup

At least 13 people were arrested in the capital, Bangkok, and seven others in the country’s northeast after they staged protests against Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha’s rule.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments