Nation & World News

Saudis Reject Security Council Seat, Citing ‘Double Standards’

By Scott Neuman on October 18th, 2013

Saudi Arabia says it will turn down a two-year seat on the United Nation’s Security Council in protest over “double standards” in resolving international conflicts.

“Saudi Arabia … is refraining from taking membership of the U.N. Security Council until it has reformed so it can effectively and practically perform its duties and discharge its responsibilities in maintaining international security and peace,” said a Foreign Ministry statement issued on state media.

“The kingdom sees that the method and work mechanism and the double standards in the Security Council prevent it from properly shouldering its responsibilities towards world peace,” the foreign ministry said in a statement carried by state news agency SPA.

The New York Times writes:

“The gesture seemed to reflect Saudi Arabia’s simmering annoyance at the Security Council’s record in Syria, where Russia and China — two of the five permanent members — have blocked Western efforts, broadly supported by Saudi Arabia, to pressure President Bashar al-Assad. The other permanent members are the United States, Britain and France.

“The Saudi announcement came a day after Chad, Chile, Lithuania, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia were elected to seats on the 15-member Security Council for a two-year term starting in January. They replace Azerbaijan, Guatemala, Morocco, Pakistan and Togo.

“It was the first time that Saudi Arabia had sought to gain one of the nonpermanent seats on the council. Its decision to turn down the seat seemed all the more surprising because its efforts to seek representation had been taken by experts as a reflection of the kingdom’s wish to be more assertive in resolving the Syrian civil war and the Arab-Israeli conflict.”

Reuters adds:

“It is the second time this month that Saudi Arabia has made a public gesture over what it sees as the Security Council’s failure to take action to stop the civil war in Syria that has killed more than 100,000 people.

“Earlier this month, the Saudi foreign minister cancelled a speech at the U.N. General Assembly in frustration over the international inaction on Syria and the Palestinian issue, a diplomatic source said.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

#NPRreads: The ‘Grexit,’ Video Games And Fleeing The Rwandan Genocide

Also this week, misconceptions about slavery. And, the struggle for gay Christians trying to keep the faith.


Pilot In Solar-Powered Plane Sets Aviation Record

André Borschberg, flying Solar Impulse 2, set a new record of 120 hours in the cockpit on a journey from Japan to Hawaii.


Iceland’s Pirate Party Wins Repeal Of Blasphemy Law

The insurgent political movement, which has just three members in parliament, led the rollback of the 75-year-old law that made it a crime to “ridicule or insult” religious teachings.


The popular Reddit question-and-answer section /r/IAmA, along with hundreds of others, have shut down in an apparent protest over the dismissal of a key figure at the social sharing site.

Parts Of Social-Sharing Site Reddit Go Dark In Apparent User Revolt

After the firing of a key figure at the website, moderators of many of Reddit’s most popular sections have gone private in apparent protest.


Health insurance giant Aetna has announced a $37 billion plan to acquire rival Humana.

Aetna Announces $37 Billion Merger With Health Insurance Rival Humana

If the deal passes antitrust scrutiny, it would be the largest such acquisition in the insurance industry. It’s the latest sign of consolidation in health insurance in the wake of Obamacare.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments