Nation & World News

Arrest Made In Dry Ice Bomb Case At LA Airport

By Scott Neuman on October 16th, 2013

Police have arrested a baggage handler in connection with a series of dry ice bombs, two of which exploded harmlessly at the Los Angeles International Airport in recent days.

Dicarlo Bennett, 28, an employee for the ground handling company Servisair, was booked on Tuesday for “possession of a destructive device near an aircraft,” The Associated Press reports. He is being held on $1 million bail.

Investigators believe that Bennett took the dry ice from an airplane and assembled several of the crude devices, placing one in an employee restroom Sunday night and another on a tarmac outside the international terminal, the AP says.

The arrest follows two explosions in as many days and the discovery of two others that apparently caused no injuries or damage.

As we wrote on Monday, dry ice bombs are relatively harmless and simple, but they could injure someone who is close by when an explosion occurs.

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