Nation & World News

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

By Scott Neuman on October 9th, 2013

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here’s a rundown of Wednesday’s Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

– Correspondent Ari Shapiro logs Tuesday’s tit-for-tat between the president and House Speaker John Boehner:

“The day began with a phone call between House Speaker John Boehner and President Obama,” Shapiro says. “Each side put out a statement describing the conversation. And for once the parties agreed — the call changed no one’s mind. A few hours later, Obama took to the White House briefing room and urged Republicans to end these crises.”

Correspondent Scott Horsley says that while Washington bickers over the shutdown and a possible default, the rest of the world is just as nervous as we are — maybe more so.

Economic historian and author Daniel Yergin tells Horsley: “The whole global economy, the whole system of payments and trade and investment — it all rests upon confidence. And at the center of that confidence is the United States. The very big rock of Gibraltar. And if it can’t play that role, everybody’s worse off, including the United States.”

Host Renee Montagne speaks with Idaho Rep. Raul Labrador, a member of the Tea Party caucus who outlines the conservative wing’s thinking. Labrador says he personally “would be willing to give the president a one-year [continuing resolution] and a lot of conservatives are there with me — which would be good for the president — in exchange for a one-year delay in the implementation of Obamacare.”

“We’re not the ones who wanted to shut down the government; we need to remember that,” he says. “When the shutdown occurred a week ago, it was the Democrats that said the Republicans wanted to shut down the government. There wasn’t a single Republican in the House [who] wanted to shut down the government. We wanted to keep the government open.”

– Finally, host David Green spoke with Phil Glover, a corrections officer at the Johnstown Federal Prison in southwestern Pennsylvania and regional vice president for the Council of Prison Locals union, who says he and his colleagues are considered essential, but that as of Oct. 1, they won’t be getting a paycheck.

“The next paycheck they get will be next week, and they will get a six-day paycheck for working two full weeks,” Glover says.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

LeBron James Will Reportedly Return To The Cleveland Cavaliers

LeBron James will play for the Cleveland Cavaliers next season, according to multiple reports. The NBA star opted out of his contract with the Heat after spending four seasons in Miami.


Elephant Featured In Film ‘Alexander’ Killed By Thai Poachers

The 50-year-old Asian elephant, named Phlai Khlao, was apparently poisoned before his tusks were hacked off. Thai authorities are questioning a suspect who is a former elephant handler.


Luis Suarez will wear the number 9 for Barcelona.

Liverpool Unloads ‘The Biter,’ Sending Suarez To Barca For $128 Million

Luis Suarez, the Uruguayan punished for biting an opponent during the World Cup, is moving to Barcelona. The team reached terms with Liverpool in a transfer widely reported at more than $128 million.


German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier at a news conference at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin, Germany, on Friday. Steinmeier will meet Secretary of State John Kerry this weekend to discuss allegations of U.S. spying.

Germany Calls For ‘Honest Foundation’ In Relations With U.S.

The remarks by Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier follow fresh allegations of U.S. spying on Germany as well as Berlin’s request that the top U.S. intelligence official in the country leave.


Ukrainian soldiers man a checkpoint about 30 miles from Donetsk, Thursday. Government officials said Friday that a rocket attack had killed as many as 30 soldiers.

Dozens Of Ukrainian Troops Reportedly Killed By Militants

Separatists in the east used a rocket-launching system in an attack that one officials said killed as many as 30 government troops. The strike comes after days of steady gains by Ukrainian forces.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments