Nation & World News

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

By Scott Neuman on October 9th, 2013

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here’s a rundown of Wednesday’s Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

– Correspondent Ari Shapiro logs Tuesday’s tit-for-tat between the president and House Speaker John Boehner:

“The day began with a phone call between House Speaker John Boehner and President Obama,” Shapiro says. “Each side put out a statement describing the conversation. And for once the parties agreed — the call changed no one’s mind. A few hours later, Obama took to the White House briefing room and urged Republicans to end these crises.”

Correspondent Scott Horsley says that while Washington bickers over the shutdown and a possible default, the rest of the world is just as nervous as we are — maybe more so.

Economic historian and author Daniel Yergin tells Horsley: “The whole global economy, the whole system of payments and trade and investment — it all rests upon confidence. And at the center of that confidence is the United States. The very big rock of Gibraltar. And if it can’t play that role, everybody’s worse off, including the United States.”

Host Renee Montagne speaks with Idaho Rep. Raul Labrador, a member of the Tea Party caucus who outlines the conservative wing’s thinking. Labrador says he personally “would be willing to give the president a one-year [continuing resolution] and a lot of conservatives are there with me — which would be good for the president — in exchange for a one-year delay in the implementation of Obamacare.”

“We’re not the ones who wanted to shut down the government; we need to remember that,” he says. “When the shutdown occurred a week ago, it was the Democrats that said the Republicans wanted to shut down the government. There wasn’t a single Republican in the House [who] wanted to shut down the government. We wanted to keep the government open.”

– Finally, host David Green spoke with Phil Glover, a corrections officer at the Johnstown Federal Prison in southwestern Pennsylvania and regional vice president for the Council of Prison Locals union, who says he and his colleagues are considered essential, but that as of Oct. 1, they won’t be getting a paycheck.

“The next paycheck they get will be next week, and they will get a six-day paycheck for working two full weeks,” Glover says.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Americans Detained In N. Korea Urge U.S. To Secure Their Release

In interviews with CNN and The Associated Press, Kenneth Bae, Jeffrey Fowle and Matthew Miller appealed to the U.S. to send a senior representative to secure their release.


The Flight Of The Passenger Pigeon, Now 100 Years Extinct

Passenger pigeons were once the world’s most abundant bird, but they were also the cheapest protein available. The last passenger pigeon, Martha, died exactly a century ago at the Cincinnati Zoo.


British Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons on Monday that he wants to give police the power to seize the passports of Islamist fighters bound for Iraq and Syria.

U.K. Seeks To Expand Terrorism Laws To Target British Fighters

Prime Minister David Cameron wants to give police the power to seize passports of Islamist fighters bound for Iraq and Syria. On Friday, Britain raised its threat level to “severe” from “substantial.”


The first edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the original hero Golden Egg from the film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory on display at Profiles In History in Calabasas, northwest of downtown Los Angeles, on July 19, 2012.

For Anniversary, A New Chapter Of ‘Charlie And The Chocolate Factory’

The chapter describes the Vanilla Fudge Room, an extra room in the chocolate factory. In it, Charlie Bucket goes to the factory with his mother – not his grandfather. The book turns 50 this month.


Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov called Monday for a cease-fire in Ukraine, but demanded that Ukrainian troops leave positions from which they can "harm the civilian population." His comments come ahead of talks in Minsk, Belarus, involving Ukraine, Russia, Russia-backed separatists and international monitors.

Pro-Russia Rebels Say They Will Settle For Autonomy In Ukraine

It’s a step back from the full independence they were seeking and may reflect a Russian desire to end the crisis, which has led to Moscow’s worst ties with the West since the end of the Cold War.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments